Exciting new Jaeger model

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetsplus, Apr 27, 2014.

  1. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    One of the results of my recent trip to Europe is a new Jaeger model, the Jaeger Heavyweight.

    Described here:
    New Jaeger Model

    Or in longhand:
    A couple of weeks ago I flew to Europe because the factory making my Jaeger Bb trumpets told me they had some new options I might like to check out.

    One option they showed me was a heavyweight bell made on the same mandrel as my standard bell. It was 20% thicker and weighed almost 3 oz more than the standard weight. I was hesitant at first, because I do not necessarily agree with the design concept of heavier being better. We like our trumpets to dance! Due to material availability and the factory’s production capability, these bells will only be available in very limited numbers.

    We mounted this bell on one of my Jaeger trumpets but found that the rest of the instrument needed other changes in order to better match this bell. Specifically we added more mass to the small braces on the fixed tubing of the first and third valve slides. and added some ferrule rings to the upper and lower tuning slide receiver tubes. The trumpet was responding pretty well at this stage so I decided to bring it home for more intensive testing in a familiar environment.

    Back home we found that we has to add a brace to the tuning slide and decouple the front brace going to the bell (the normal Jaeger has only the rear brace decoupled).

    Needless to say, this new model plays really well. I have a demonstrator here in my shop whilst I wait for some refinishing to be done locally. This model will be on display at the ITG conference in a few weeks.

    P.S. there is more to come...........
     
  2. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    hey Ivan,

    I bought a pre-owned Jaeger for my shop recently and sold it yesterday to a client. They were amazed by the incredible quality and super fair priced! I almost sold another in the shop as well yesterday (the one you brought up when you visited the shop).

    These horns are fantastic and so are you!

    I can't wait to check out the new horn (think I need to take a road trip soon).


    Best,
    T
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Thanks Trent

    Yes, I think it's your turn :roll::roll:
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I'm quite intrigued by this comment, Ivan. Don't get me wrong, I dearly love my Wild Thing and Severinsen, even when they distort a little when I push them. It works on the sort of music I tend to use them for.

    The Yam is only a couple of ounces heavier, but that seems to make all the difference for playing stuff where I want it to stay true at maximum dynamic.

    Is your 'dance' the same as my 'distortion', or is that a daft question?
     
  5. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Seth, this comment came from one of my students who I asked to play 2 trumpets I made; one with Bauerfeind valves, and one with the valves I currently use. His comment that the second trumpet "wanted to dance" I interpret as his feeling more light and up, rather then stodgy. Don't get me wrong, I am not making a criticism of the operation of the Bauerfeind valves, just passing on that the other valves seemed more jazzy. Sometimes too much precision can detract from art. I often say that the valve section is the heart and soul of any trumpet; this was an example of a student's noticing that feeling.
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Hmm, you've lost me a bit there, Ivan. I thought we were talking about bell weights. I might be interested in something around the 2lb 8oz mark so long as it didn't look like a pimped up '56 Chevy Bel-Air (you know of what I speak ;-))
     
  7. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Ivan, for those of us who don't manufacture trumpets for a living, would you please describe what a decoupled brace is?
     
  8. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    I use the word decouple to refer to the concept of a shock mount - where two things are physically connected but do not transmit all the vibrations between them e.g. shock mount for a microphone, car engine mounts. In our case it refers to the small hole drilled in the middle of the brace which SEEMS to partially insulate one end from the other. The word "decouple" is used to refer to whatever is is which remarkably changes the response of the trumpet. This reads a little vaguely because the only thing that is obvious is the change in playing, no-one has yet come up with a computer model of a trumpet which will predict what any of these changes will do to the response (hence the use of the word "SEEMS"). I borrow the usage from Ekkehard Gorski who was an engineer with BMW working on decoupling on their vehicles. He had several versions of saxophone strap hooks (and harness systems) which were coiled and slightly sprung and wanted me to do an involved brace with coils returned on themselves, but this would not have given the strength required.
     
  9. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    My old Range Rover used 'air bags' in between the frame and the body, mostly for the variable ground clearance adjustment, but also decoupled the body from the road vibration (along with other traditional suspension systems) to a very good end.
    I suppose placing the 'air bag' behind the mouthpiece does not have the same effect. :p
     
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Drilling a small hole in a brace will make it more rigid. The more rigid a brace is the more it prevents
    whatever the two surfaces it spans from vibrating.
     

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