expanding range without shallow cup

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by songbook, Dec 7, 2013.

  1. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2003
    Rochester, MN
    Please excuse the coming thread topic departure-

    Nobody plays a Harrelson and buys it for looks.

    I've got a couple Getzen 300's I use for experimentation. They are really good basic horns.
    I wouldn't call them a "student" horn because that is a marketing term. Rather I say they are a great choice for
    anyone one a limited budget.

    I had a Getzen Renaissance for a while. It was better. If I had to play an off the shelf horn any Getzen is a good choice.

    However, you simply cannot compare an off the shelf horn, Getzen, Bach, Yamaha, et.al., with a custom made Harrelson
    made to fit each player after an individual consultation with the horn builder master Jason Harrelson.
    His horns are simply in another league.

    I used to believe it was all BS, until I played one. Then I bought, then another, then another.

    Harrelson trumpets may look "wild", "cool", etc, but the reason they are the best selling custom made horn
    is because they work better, not look better.
     
  2. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Apr 25, 2010
    From what I understand my Eterna was made sometime in the early 70's. The horn still has an amazing sound, and the valves are as smooth as ever. The store as well as the owner have since gone, but my horn is still giving me much enjoyment.
     
  3. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

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    Nov 15, 2003
    Queens, NY
    Gosh, I hope in my remarks I didn't imply anything disparaging towards Harrelson. Quite the opposite! I am thinking of getting him to build me a custom pocket trumpet! I played a Summit horn someone had at a jazz gig over the summer and was extremely impressed. I think the whole horn industry is going towards the way of the small-time custom private horn maker and that is a good thing. Harrelson, Lawler, Marcinkiewicz, etc. I was talking more about my experiences of talking with buyers and sellers on the internet. You know, just a couple of months ago I tried to sell a Kanstul 700S horn over the net for an extremely low price. It was almost new, except a HS kid had taken sandpaper to the outside of the horn to try to make a 'brushed silver' look. You can imagine how it turned out! I took pics and put it up in various places. But I described it quite accurately. That it plays like a Bach 37 but better. I even put a couple of clips of from using it on a jazz record date: Kanstul 700S demo - rough mix 1 - YouTube Kanstul 700S Rough Mix 2 - YouTube I had to get it satin refinished though before I could even sell it at a decent price. Then someone snapped it right up. I only sold it because I got the Benge 2x+ for lead/commercial and the Blessing 1580G for small group jazz.. So I didn't need the Kanstul..but if I had to go with one horn to cover everything, that would be one I would pick. So, again, no disrespect to Jason Harrelson and his great horns.. I'm sure I'll own more than one at some point as I am a big fan.

    As to the Lead Assymetric.. I always liked the powerful, cutting sound of it..but the diameter was just way too big for me. I always wondered why he never decided to make them in different diameters.. Great concept if you can get it to work for you. All the best, Lex
     
  4. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    Oct 9, 2013
    Roseburg, OR
    When I played the Asymmetric (about a year, IIRC), I lost a lot of flexibility. The way it pins the lower lip didn't work for me. The Harrison Wedge MPs I have played for the last several years work great for me. I get the upper range support is a small diameter MP while getting the big sound of a medium diameter MP.
     
  5. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

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    Nov 15, 2003
    Queens, NY
    I just played a gig with a buddy of mine. A pro here in NY, Matt Hilgenberg, who is a wonderful trumpet player who has been using The Wedge for years and loves them. I had some in the 12 size. They r fantastic pieces. Dave Harrison is a super cat too. I remember when he first came up with the idea for himself and was writing about it on the TH.
    I've been working into an MF top based off of his early Calicchio piece from Derek Saidak at legendsmpc.com. I always knew MF and the guy who helped him with that unusual style of mouthpiece was on to a great idea. Obvious when u hear MF and know the story behind his chops and that design of mthpc. But his diameter was always too big 4 me. That type of piece feels just about .25 larger than it measures. So my .590 top has a. 615 feel to it. MFs top measures at .630.
     
  6. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    Oct 9, 2013
    Roseburg, OR
    I have had a hard time trying to compare mine to what Bach it feels like. My size is a 6-13 DGC/25 with a Warburton KT backbore cut for Reeves sleeves.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    No arguments with your experience - in general this is a problem with any mpc and people applying pressure for notes - I've used a light grip and in general a small aperature that doesn't get pinned on any mpc - I can whip out a Bach 3C and nail a high G - but somehow the Asymmetric is just "easier" for me to use, albeit I use that mpc most all the time. I had a custom Asymmetric mpc made for my trombone and whether that helps me play better or not - the mpc reduced the size of the inside area of the mpc for the trombone and it seems much less fatiguing than my Olds 3 mpc the trom came with
     
  8. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    108
    Oct 9, 2013
    Roseburg, OR
    I have heard guys that sound great an the Asymmetric. It could be that I placed the Asymmetric to low. I tried to follow the 1/3 upper 2/3 lower rule, but I'll bet I placed like I do now, which is more 50/50.
     
  9. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Apr 25, 2010
    Thanks to all of you who responded to my thread. I learned quite a bit, and I'm sure others have as well.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    I can play the Asymmetric 342 lead and find it unique, but not the "magic" for the altissimo range; still sticking with the precept that if one cannot get up there with other mouthpieces, this one won't get one there either. True, it tends to nullify the lower lip vibration ... but as I observe so many players with conventional mouthpieces, they too tend to lean their mouthpieces on the lower side of the rim to the lower lip, taking the force of their left elbow pressure on it while hoping to emulate Maynard Ferguson and others.
     

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