Extrospection

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Vulgano Brother, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    VB is talking about deeper, and being prepared works there too.
    An important part is the realisation that we will NEVER be FULLY prepared and can still leave the ballast behind. In Jobs' case, he had help from the outside telling him to loosen up! He was better prepared than he thought.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The ballast is the 20% between 120% and 100%.
    Some midi programs have a factor called "humanizing". This introduces small irregularities in an attempt to make the machine less than perfect. It is this unrehearsed less than perfect that throws us off sometimes.
    How many times have you all been praised for rehearsing "unconcentrated" or diarrhea or stomach ache or whatever the day before a concert?
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Well stated! The question now is, what stuff is it that makes up the 20%?

    The strange thing is, at least in my experience, is that it is easy to do the "impossible", when it is unexpected or unavoidable -- sight reading a concert as a last minute substitute or playing sick and playing exceptionally well. Of course things can't help but go better than expected when we have no expectations, but very often these performances are splendid masterpieces -- better than if or as we had practised and rehearsed them. Curious.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    My 100 to 120% is sheer will power. If I have that focal point, I can move mountains. On the days(weeks, years) that I do not, the mountains move me. A real pro has more routine and therefore somewhat more room to move before a mistake becomes audible.
     
  6. bilboboone

    bilboboone New Friend

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    I call it zen, being so in the moment that the world just melts away and there is no concious thought. I like to think of myself in this mind state as a vessel through which the muse expresses herself.

    May not be what the Buddhists mean by zen, but...

    Boone
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I feel 'ya, Bilbo, and most of us have experienced that zen feeling of the music playing us, but for some/most/all of us, that can leave at mysterious and dangerous moments; we will colapse into ourselves, and implode. In other words, we'll suck. The question is how can we reverse that "implosion" during performance and step back into the flow. I am still mystified.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2007
  8. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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  9. bilboboone

    bilboboone New Friend

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    Exactly, you must perform with no ego. How do you do this? Well there are many methods but in the end it is your approach or mindset. Are you performing for yourself or for others? Are you worried about failure or success? Are you thinking about intonation, fingerings, technical things? Thinking about any of these things, really anything at all is a sure fire way to fail at performing without ego. Zen is the absence of thought as I see it.

    I'll use an anology from another of my interests, mountain biking. In mountain biking if you think you are going to crash, you are going to crash. If you think you are not going to crash you are going to crash. If you don't think about it and just ride, you probably won't crash.

    How can we reverse an implosion? Stop thinking and start doing. Practicing meditation (especially before practice) has helped many artist achieve this. I understand it is much easier to say "stop thinking start doing" than it is to actually accomplish this; meditation is a great way to practice turning your mind off and experience this "oneness" with the universe. And you don't have to believe in Buddhism or Hinduism to meditate so it is good for people of all religions or no religion.

    Boone
     
  10. JunkyT

    JunkyT Pianissimo User

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    Good thoughts, Boone. Recently, I have been starting my practice sessions with some deep breathing (meditation), and I can't tell you what a positive thing this has been for me. It gets me focused, clears my mind, fills me with oxygen and reminds me what a full breath feels like...all before I even touch my horn. Going into my shedding with this mindset allows me more discipline and focus than I've ever had, and as such I'm enjoying practicing more and getting more out of it.

    Even if the word "meditation" turns you off, just try closing your eyes and taking 10 full breaths before you play. Try it...you may like it!
     

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