Falling Mute

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmanic, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    Roger-that, and ditto to the deed.........thanks.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    "+" followed by any number usually means you agree with the previous post or in my case (+4), the previous 3 posters that suggested exhaling into the bell. Old cork usually just needs to be replaced. It's not hard to do, except for tuning the mute buy sanding down the corks. On my horns, the further in the mute goes, the sharper the pitch becomes, and it can also hit the bell in case of my cup (that needs new corks :roll:). I've always exhaled into the bell, even before my corks were worn out, it's what my teacher said to do. He is a pro. So at least I look like a pro when I get ready to insert a mute! :cool:
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Something to consider, although they do tend to be a bit more costly, are the replacement JoRal corks. They are composite, made of both real cork and bits of rubber, and they stick quite well.
     
  4. MusicianOfTheNight

    MusicianOfTheNight Pianissimo User

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    JoRal makes wonderful corks. I also like the Soulo mute corks.
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I just mentioned the JoRal corks because I was issued a JoRal straight mute by the National Guard band, but it had no corks on it - possibly why it was still sitting there in supply? In any case, I wanted to use it, so I figured I'd replace the corks with what came with it. I like them a lot.
     
  6. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    1. Wash your cork with soap and hot water, scrub it lightly with a toothbrush to make sure it's really clean.
    2. Exhale into your bell, a little moisture goes a long ways. Some days you may even need to put a little moisture on the cork--and yes, I lick it. Nobody else even asks to borrow your mute after they see that. But 99 times out of 100 simply exhaling into your bell is enough.
    3. Does everyone do this (exhaling into the bell)? No. But almost all the guys I've played with over the past 50 years have--pros and good amateurs alike. Today, if I play with someone who is doing nothing or something else, I show them the technique.
    4. Rubberized cork is great, much better than regular cork. Felpro gaskets make rubberized gasket making sheets you can buy at the local auto parts store, the thickest is maybe 3 times thicker than standard and I really like for harmons. You can find a template for harmon mute cork online. A little cement--most use contact cement, I tend toward urethane glues--and you're good to go if you need to replace the old cork.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that using cork should stand review. We are in the 21st century and the developments in synthetics do allow for considerable improvement. Silicone caulking can be squirted into a form and then used to replace cork - with very positive results (been there, done that).

    Still, a properly tuned cork can be very reliable, make removal easy if you have to switch quickly and it also gives you a reason to drink fine wines for replacements.
     
  8. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 9, 2015
    I like the silicone calking replacement. Can you explain how do this? A YouTube video would be great!
     
  9. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    A light sanding of glazed, compressed corks usually does not affect position in the bell, but it does uncover slightly more flexible cork underneath. If this quick and inexpensive fix doesn't work, replacing the corks would be a good idea; it's neither difficult nor expensive. I used to breathe into the bell, but maintaining flexible corks has eliminated that necessity, even for Harmon-style mutes. I admit that I sometimes still breathe on the bell before inserting a Harmon-style mute, however. :oops: Some habits are hard to break.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Take a conventional candle. Cut (knife) or melt (hot spoon handle) a groove in it the size of a mute cork. Fill the groove with silicone caulking, let it dry for 3 days. Peel it out and use the silicone caulking to glue it to the mute.
     

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