Fancy Equipment

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by screamingmorris, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The difference has nothing to do with the number of hertz you have to bridge, it has to do with the trumpet having a more uniform resistance the higher you play. In the lower octaves the resistance is all over the place.
     
  2. screamingmorris

    screamingmorris Mezzo Forte User

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    I had long said that I wanted to live long enough to be able to play Double C's, that I wanted to be able to play Double C's before I die.

    Well, after a I made that slight adjustment about 3 weeks ago, my range suddenly jumped half an octave and I have been playing gentle scales up to Double C several times every day.

    That leaves me with the following 2 interesting attitudes:

    1.
    Mark Twain said that he would die when Halley's Comet returned, and sure enough he did.
    Since I kept saying that I wanted to play Double C's before I die, does my suddenly playing Double C's mean that the end is near?

    2.
    With my adjustment in embouchure, clicking into a soft falsetto mode above High C, playing up to Double C now is relatively easy, as long as I settle for gentle squeals that I can hold for 10 seconds.
    So now I am left with the feeling of "So what was the big deal about Double C's?"
    I almost take the Double C's for granted now, thinking "No big deal", rather than thinking of them as the Holy Grail of trumpet playing.
    Don Quixote who has no more windmills to conquer is a sad thing.
    And setting a next goal for Triple C's would seem rather silly since I am an amateur who has trouble playing anything faster than quarter notes.
    The dragon killer has run out of dragons...

    - Morris
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2008
  3. JRFIII

    JRFIII Pianissimo User

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    I had long said that I wanted to live long enough to be able to play Double C's, that I wanted to be able to play Double C's before I die.

    Hey man, I hope your not planning on leaving us now just 'cause you got there...
     
  4. screamingmorris

    screamingmorris Mezzo Forte User

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    OK, I'll have something to live for if you'll sell me your Getzen for $5 ;-)

    - Morris
     
  5. screamingmorris

    screamingmorris Mezzo Forte User

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    What I describe above is actually a common psychological phenomenon.

    A person has a strongly desired goal that gives him pleasure and gives him a purpose in life.

    If that person finally achieves that goal, there is a brief moment of pride,
    but that is followed by a persistent feeling of emptiness because there is no longer that goal to strive for.

    The person continues to feel empty until he finds a new goal to occupy his time.

    I am finally squeaking Double C's, so my next goal should be...?

    Although Washington DC needs my wisdom and leadership, running for President costs too much money.

    I can't become Pope because I'm Protestant.

    I want to be a grandpa with grandkids to play with, but my liberal feminist daughter doesn't plan on having kids anytime in the next 20 years.

    Until I think of a new goal, I'll just stay busy by buying a pellet gun and shooting the neighborhood cats that keep killing our baby birds and baby rabbits...
    Gonna have to get that special hat and coat to complete the Elmer Fudd hunting ensemble...
    Rabbit Fire - a Classic Cartoon with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd

    - Morris
     
  6. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Well Morris, you have repeatedly told us of one thing that 'should be' a major goal for you. You claim that you have extreme difficulty playing anything faster than quarter notes. Cure that!! It will become an obsession with you to be able to play from the Arbans, Clarkes etc. manuals, and a great joy when you accomplish it.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  7. screamingmorris

    screamingmorris Mezzo Forte User

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    You mean that people actually *read* the stuff I post???????

    Uh-oh.....

    Quarter notes are plenty fast enough for "Amazing Grace" and "Danny Boy" and "What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life?", and those are the only 3 songs that a person really needs to play.

    Next thing you'll be telling me to learn to play in different keys.... :roll:

    - Morris
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Morris,
    we only play in other keys when our contracts specifically mention accidentals.

    If you have trouble tonguing, add scales to your daily routine: quarter notes up and then back down, then the same double tongued (tukutukutuuuuuuh on each note)!
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Start working on Carnival of Venice in the back of the Arban's book - that should ensure you a long life.:play:
     
  10. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Staffordshire
    Thanks Mr.S Morris for the interesting post. Tongued PP scales is something i have been working on recently and i have found it has helped to relax my tongue and extend my range to a reasonably solid Brandenburg A. I can play a double C with brute force, but frankly it's not worth the effort! I aim to try and play it pp first with only a little mpc pressure.
     

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