Fascinating (great for historical research) "Music Trade" periodical viewable online

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gordonfurr1, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Aug 2, 2010
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    Possibly already well-known to many of this forum interested in historic aspects of the vintage music trades, but was a pleasant discovery to moi..this periodical includes articles and ads about instruments, manufacturers, developments, artists, venues, profits, investments, detailed factory catalogues...etc.

    Detailed and well written, the compendium "MUSIC TRADE" is a wealth of information, and may be of considerable use to those seeking information about their vintage instrument as it was published monthly and ran for a goodly number of years.

    "MUSIC TRADE"

    I am having difficulty sharing the links on my wife's tablet...but if you Google "MUSIC TRADE" you can find various links to digital online copies, and ebooks which you can view or download.

    Wikipedia also has some links including some through Princeton University.

    I spent a good bit of time enjoying the 1922 edition August and September postings.
    Enjoy! Please add a direct link to a good ebook version if you can.
     
  2. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    Re: Fascinating (great for historical research) "Music Trade" periodical viewable on

    I find the 1990s editions of Music Trades was helpful in finding out more info about UMI...but they sold out their old backlog to HighBeam, ransoming their old articles because of HighBeam's fees and partial article previews...BugMeNot happened to have an account that I was able to use for a few days to view the articles...
     
  3. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    Re: Fascinating (great for historical research) "Music Trade" periodical viewable on

    The link I stumbled upon for the 1922 edition seemed to have no limitations to my perusal...but couldn't copy data for sharing.
     

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