Fat Face

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Beef, May 26, 2010.

  1. Beef

    Beef New Friend

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    Feb 26, 2010
    Hi,

    Ive recently lost a couple of stone and I think its affected my playing.
    My face is thinner and my lips don't seem to fit the mouthpiece quite so well.

    Has anyone else experianced this?

    I would say that quite a few famous players have fat faces. Does this help?

    Beef
     
  2. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    Feb 28, 2008
    Los Gatos, CA
    I wish!!....

    ;-)

    Seriously, I haven't noticed my weight in my face so much as elsewhere, so I haven't noticed anything like fat lips (or a change in their shape) affecting my sound.

    What I have noticed, having recently put on a few pounds, is that my overall physical endurance has gone down a little bit. In prior weight fluctuations, I've noticed a general endurance improvement being associated with a weight loss. It's probably due to a general improvement in my overall fitness.

    I suppose that an actual shrinkage of your lips would be somewhat akin to a slight increase in the size of your mouthpiece. In my book, that's a good thing! I buy into the Schilke concept of using the largest mouthpiece possible, and working into it!

    I don't know if that helps at all, but here it is anyway!

    Guy Clark
     
  3. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    Between 1st year of college and now (7 years) I have lost 60lb and not noticed it affecting my playing.

    My practice habits have affected my playing the most. (for better and worse)
     
  4. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2010
    dubuque iowa
    I suspect there are other reasons at work. If your weight loss has improved your health in general, which I assume it has, then you should notice an improvement in ability as it can be hand in hand with your wellbeing in general. If you have a question about mpc size try borrowing a slightly smaller size from a friend and giving it a good two week play test. I guess stranger things have happened. Best wishes.
     
  5. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

    449
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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    Am I correct in my understanding that Doc Severinson is a little guy, 5'5" and maybe 130-140 lbs at the age in that film?

    And I have to say, that sax player looks a bit like Geo. W. Bush to me, GWB's sax playing sure is better than Clinton's.
     
  6. trumpetman41

    trumpetman41 Pianissimo User

    67
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    Feb 17, 2009
    Omaha, NE
    I never noticed any difference no matter what weight I was at. I couldn,t tell any difference on Al Hirt either.....
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    A big increase or decrease of weight can have an incredible impact on your playing - not because of the mouthpiece though.

    Depending how you lose weight, you can drain your body of water (very common) and as hydration is a big issue while playing, things can get much tougher.

    Once the water loss stage is over, then you burn more calories than you take in. Depending on when you practice, you may be simply too weak.

    Improper diets cause the body to reduce energy to the brain. Yes a stupid diet can lead to decreased brain activity. That also will cause a BIG difference.

    So it is not the stones lost, it is the process that determines the effect. We have to carefully judge the effects before wiping out a playing career.

    When issues with brass instruments occur, the mouthpiece is the last place to look.
     

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