Favourite Arban's exercises?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tjcombo, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Hi I am working on page 344 Variations Norma"and the first variation is in 12/8 and I am having trouble counting it out correctly also I am a comeback player with about 1 year of lessons But I wanted to tackle it my teacher said it is hard but not impossible to do but boy I am sort of sorry now but I guess I will give it the old Italian go Rudy try again Anthony
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    My father's all time favourite. You won't go far wrong by drawing some inspiration from this version:

     
  3. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    Interesting variety in responses - almost polarized between using the Arban's as a trumpet equivalent of weightlifting, jogging and/or swimming laps and more artistic/musical angles - phrasing, interpretation. I'm sure most of us are looking for advances (or at least maintenance :-)) on both poles whatever we play, but great to share your thoughts.
     
  4. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Apr 25, 2010
    In my arbans book which goes back many years, it would be page 217, number 90. Verdi's "Traviata". Lots of fun to play, as well as being a little workout.
     
  5. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Interesting variations on page numbers between Arban copies.
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I'm guessing that most of our friends across the water will be working from reprints of the Goldman/Carl Fischer 1912 version which have 90 pages of "The Art of Phrasing - 150 Classic and Popular Melodies" upstream of the "Fourteen Grand Studies" (which they call "Characteristic Studies").

    British versions are based on Fitz-Gerald/Hawkes & Son 1907 which don't have the 'Art of Phrasing' section but have Eighteen Solos rather than 12 "Celebrated Fantaisies and Airs Varies" (any wonder they can't spell ;-))

    Paging is okay to 190 though exercise number correlation goes wobbly a bit earlier than that.
     
  7. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    The experts out there (and even the non-hacks) will probably find my perspective facile, but as a long layoff comebacker without a solid foundation in the first place, I'll offer a mini-epiphany I just had last night.

    I just bought my second copy of Arban's. The first was bought in the mid-70's, I was trying to self-teach as we didn't
    have a music program in school. I couldn't make heads nor tails of it, and I reckon it disappeared when my mom held a garage sale along the way. I learned a bunch of exercises, source unknown, in drum corps, and I've been trying to remember/reassemble them and that's been working out OK.

    Last night I sat down without the horn, but with my new (spiral bound courtesy of Kinko's) Arban's and a pencil and just read my way through the first 20 or so exercises in each section, noting that a lot of them are the same exercise in a different key. I circled the ones that I could easily decipher and that will become part of my work. At this point my perspective was definitely "weightlifting". But.....just working through reading them without trying to play...I was surprised at how much easier it started to become to read the music, particularly the rhythms. I think being presented with the written notes in more easily predictable patterns of an exercise than, say, a 4th trumpet part of a song, is making my brain click in a way it never did before.

    My music reading has been the equivalent of reading individual letters and trying to sound them out to form words. I think I just started to recognize common syllables if not whole words. A small but significant leap that I'm sure will lead to recognizing phrases and idioms, and I think that's when you start to really be able to communicate in the language of the music.

    For the exercises I circled, anyway, I was able to make the connection between the black marks on the page and what Arban wanted me to play.
     
  8. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    Hi Pinstriper, good to hear that you're extracting some of the goodness that Arban's offers. A couple of things that you might find useful in the absence of a teacher - a metronome drives the sort of conscientious practice that occurs when you know that you have to play the exercise for your teacher next week. It's real easy to think "yep, I've nailed that", when in fact there is more work needed and more benefit to be gained from an exercise. Of course I'm offering advice that I struggle to take myself during lazier times :-).

    Also, Eric Bolvin has written an e-book called The Arban Manual which guides you through sets of exercises. This overcomes a deficiency of Arban where exercises are grouped by skills - i.e. tonguing, syncopation, lip slurs, rather than in a day to day practice routine.
     
  9. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    Thanks, TJ. I actually picked up a $5 metronome I could use for that purpose. I'll look into the Bolvin book. I did pick up something called "100 Lessons for the Comeback Player" or similar that I've been toying with.

    I would take some private lessons - money I have, it's the time I can't commit and I wouldn't want to waste the teacher's time scheduling lessons and then having to lamely tell them "sorry, I had four production server deployments this week and am already down to 6 hours sleep a day so I didn't practice anything".
     
  10. mhendricks

    mhendricks Pianissimo User

    Eric Bolvin "The Arban Manual" is excellent. Try one lesson a week, start at lesson one and go all the way through the book, highly recommended.

    Mark Hendricks
    MPH Music - Mark Hendricks - MPHmusic.com
     

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