fear of running with the big dogs

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mike ansberry, May 5, 2005.

  1. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

    1,217
    322
    Dec 30, 2003
    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    I am a lower eschelon pro in my area. I have my niche and play with a bebop quintet, a 70's style rock horn band, and do a good bit of church music in brass ensembles. I just got a call to do a recording session with some of the big dogs in the area. I took the job, but I know what will happen. I will get up tight, which will affect my ability to concentrate. I'll make a silly mistake somewhere, and then worrying about that mistake will cause others. I know I should relax and attack the job with some confidence. I'm a good player and capable of handling the part. But how do you relax and focus when the pressure is on?
     
  2. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

    Age:
    34
    1,884
    5
    Mar 22, 2005
    Boston
    Mike,
    You sound like you've already blown it. There's probably a pretty good reason why you're getting called by "the big dogs," so my advice is to just find a way to chill out and remain positive before the gig so that maybe you wont have these problems at the gig. Just my 2/100s.
    -jimi
     
  3. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

    841
    4
    Nov 5, 2003
    Dubai, UAE
    Jimi's right don't blow it before you've played a note.

    Relax, take a deep breath and listen. Turn up on time or a little early if you can..don't hurry, make sure you've got all your gear (including pencils etc). You got the call..that's the hard part, you've got the chops or wouldn't have got the call. The guy in charge thinks you can do it..so should you.

    Just my thoughts.

    Regards,

    Trevor
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    dear Mike,

    I was going to write last night but this is an important question and I wanted to sleep on it.

    Firstly, you're not going through anything that I haven't gone through in the early part of my career. I got to do stuff with a lot of great players, especially jingles and the like. I also felt apprehensive and wondered if I'd do a great job. You should know that each of these fine players you're goin gto work with have been in your position, as well, and would praobably enjoy telling you stories of their first important gigs. However, they'll likely want to tell you after the session not during. It's a head thing.

    Secondly, you should know that the only difference between you and these other fellows is time. They've been doing it longer and have a lot more experience. So, let me share a little that you may not have considered.

    It goes without saying that you go easy on coffee or anything that's going to overstimulate you. Don't avoid it completely just know how much you need to wake up. The same with foods. Today might not be the best day for the spiciest Mexican or Thai meal you've ever had. You see where I'm going wth all that.

    It goes without saying to show up to the session early. You know, the last jingle I did, I had them fax me the music and give me a brief rundown on what I was selling. When I showed up to the gig it was two takes and we were done because I knew the product and what they needed better than they did!

    Third, I have a habit of singing mentally while I play. Each and every note, I mean it. I hear the pitches clear as a bell and I have the sense that you can do this, too. You haven't blown it, not by any means. Just flood your brain with the sound of the trumpet exactly what you're supposed to be playing and you won't have room for anything else, my friend. The next thing you know, the gig is over and you have a bunch of people telling you how much they enjoyed playing with you an how much they look forward to the next time.

    As Jonathan Kent once said to his son, Clark. " You are here for a reason".

    Have fun,

    ML
     
  5. davidquinlan

    davidquinlan Pianissimo User

    Yet again, great advice from Manny!

    Cheers dude!

    :cool:
     
  6. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

    3,418
    373
    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    Always get to the date early. Have a pencil. Have a selections of mutes.
    Some of the guys in NYC have all the paperwork done before the date begins. Local 802 has downloadable W-2 and I-9 forms available.
    When you get to the gig DON'T sit in the lead chair :lol:
    Let the lead player do the talking.

    That's a start.

    Play great!

    Wilmer
     
  7. PH

    PH Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
    62
    545
    0
    Dec 2, 2003
    Bloomington, Indiana
  8. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

    1,217
    322
    Dec 30, 2003
    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    I know it sounds like I'm defeated before I start. That isn't the case. It is just that I have had a couple of experiences that have left a very negative images in my memory. I have done some studio work before, and I do get called to do some other stuff. I usually get called back, partly because I am easy to work with. I do know better than to sit on the lead book (I'd be an idiot to try that in this crowd) and that kind of thing. I will go in there with a positive attitude and give it all I've got. I just thought that maybe some of you had some visualization techniques, dietary suggestions (for some reason bananas help), or other ideas that would help calm my nerves. I knew a girl at North Texas that was a phenomenal player, but had her performances wrecked by nerves. She took beta blockers and it helped her a lot. I'm not interested in resorting to drugs, but I'm just looking for a way to calm my nerves.
     
  9. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Mike,

    Take a breath and read my post... again.

    ML
     
  10. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

    1,217
    322
    Dec 30, 2003
    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    Thanks for the advice, Manny. I avoid caffeine almost completely all of the time. My prostate doesn't like it. But that's another story. I'm gonna call the guy booking the session and see if I can get him to fax me my parts. It will help a lot to go over them. The audiation idea is a good one. I've been teaching that to all my middle school students for several years. Guess I need to listen to my own teaching.
     

Share This Page