Finding a trumpet teacher - can they really ...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jdostie, Feb 23, 2008.

  1. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

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    There are teachers around the country that speciaize in embouchure problems...though I don't know who's around these days. Doc Reinhardt in Philly was known for his work with problem embouchures. I agree that you don't really NEED a double C, but then again, if you really want to develop your range there's nothing wrong with that. I don't know where Modesto is in relation to LA or San Fran, or if you have any major universities there, but that's where I'd start.

    Different teachers have different policies, but if you found a teacher (especially one that you had to travel to see) they might be willing to see you on a monthly basis. Be prepared though, teachers of this caliber will likely not be cheap.

    Talk to people at stores, universities...other trumpet players. Call brass shops in large towns and ask if they know of someone like what you're looking for...you'll eventually find someone...

    bigtiny
     
  2. Eeviac

    Eeviac Piano User

    Jude - LOL. If Josh had jigged around a bit and played something popular/hillbilly/irish/Gypsy he'd have done great.

    I'd have probably stopped and enjoyed, but I'm pretty sociopathic. I've actually been chewed out for getting somewhere late because I literally did help a little old lady who was trying to get somewhere, walking, in the rain. Took her to the Senior Center where she was headed, she was convinced I was an ex-student from her schoolteacher days. That's about as against the values of our society as you can possibly get.

    So yeah, I'd have listened to Josh (and donated) and I also know why his performance was a wash.

    Although, didn't he find he's made pretty decent wages for his time anyway?
     
  3. asc1969

    asc1969 New Friend

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    Dec 12, 2006
    Modesto, CA
    Jdostie,

    I'm actually in Modesto too. When I first started playing last year I took a couple of lessons from a guy who teaches at Ingram & Brauns Music on Bangs Road. I can't think if his name right now but if you walk in there his business card is up at the front counter. He's a pastor at a local church as well as a martial arts instructor as well. I didn't care for his teaching style that much and if you're a comeback player, you might not either. There's a young guy I found on the Myspace page named Gabriel Eller who's a younger jazz trumpeter out of Stockton. He provided me with the name of a guy named Mic Gillete who used to be with Tower of Power. He said that he was living in Manteca and offered lessons for about $35 an hour or so. He actually has a website that I found as well (www.micgillete.com) that has an e-mail contact link for him. It looks like he still does some touring with his own band per his Appearances link on the site. He also said there's a guy at CSU Stanislaus in Turlock named Dave Scott and he was going to obtain his contact info for me about a month ago but I never heard back.
     
  4. Eeviac

    Eeviac Piano User

  5. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    1) No, I don't think so, not against values, although maybe against customary practice.

    2) How to get rich: give lessons in the theory and practice of busking. Didn't you say you helped your violin teacher get started? So you've already got experience, and a reference. (I'd suggest charging a flat fee rather than a cut of the take).
     
  6. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

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    Feb 20, 2008
    Thanks to everyone for the replies. This quote here leads me to believe that I was not entirely clear on what I am hoping for:
    1. Because I had a double G years ago, without any real training, I am thinking that a double C should be reachable for me with proper training. Do I need it, no, would it be great to have that, absolutely.
    2. I exchanged a message with a former player who somehow injured himself playing, "wrong," and I have read a number of people who said they had hit a wall in their range until embouchure changes were made, I thought, hey, maybe now would be a good time to have that checked out rather than in a year or two. Hence my question about whether they could actually see a problem with embouchure.
    3. As for monthly vs weekly lessons, it's a two-fold thing. First, I am quite sure that my wife would be less than happy about the time and money for weekly lessons (given some other activities I am involved with), and secondly, I have always though that weekly lessons were more about keeping kids on track than allowing them time to advance between lessons. I could be wrong about this, but I think as an adult, once a month would give a time to evaluate, give some pointers, and then some things to work on. Either the adult will work the material or he won't weekly lessons would not be the determining factor.
    4. Yes, I would want to work through whatever the trumpet teacher thought I needed, either concurrenlty with the stated objectives, I have a list, in order that I think I need them, but I'd rely on the teacher for that. Except that I want to be able to actually play sooner rather than later, and range needs enough work that I think that needs work right away.

    For asc1969, thanks for the information. I'll see what I can find about these teachers.
     
  7. brad361

    brad361 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 12, 2008

    Not to stray from the original poster's questions, but: LOTS of lead trumpet material goes above "high C" (the C two octaves above middle C.) I agree that many players put too much emphasis on range, at the expense sometimes of intonation, tone, articulation, etc. But most all Kenton / Woody Herman / Ferguson, etc. big band lead parts routinely go to G, sometimes beyond. Even some r&b / funk stuff goes up into that direction.
    There's a book called 'Double High C in_____ Weeks" (don't remember how many weeks, maybe 36) that uses pedal tones to extend range. It does work, I went from a C to a G in about nine months, (never got to dub C) but that particular book really puts total practice time emphasis on range, which I don't agree with. Unless of course you're already a Severinson or Marsalis with regards to technique. But of course THOSE guys already sail up above double C.
     
  8. brad361

    brad361 Pianissimo User

    120
    38
    Feb 12, 2008

    Not to stray from the original poster's questions, but: LOTS of lead trumpet material goes above "high C" (the C two octaves above middle C.) I agree that many players put too much emphasis on range, at the expense sometimes of intonation, tone, articulation, etc. But most all Kenton / Woody Herman / Ferguson, etc. big band lead parts routinely go to G, sometimes beyond. Even some r&b / funk stuff goes up into that direction.
    There's a book called 'Double High C in_____ Weeks" (don't remember how many weeks, maybe 36) that uses pedal tones to extend range. It does work, I went from a C to a G in about nine months, (never got to dub C) but that particular book really puts total practice time emphasis on range, which I don't agree with. Unless of course you're already a Severinson or Marsalis with regards to technique. But of course THOSE guys already sail up above double C.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't think that this is a safe bet. As your body matures the distribution of muscle/fat changes which changes the density of various parts of your body involved in playing. Your daily habits also change other things in your body and that will guarantee a different situation today. I used to be able to play a Schilke 14A4A mouthpiece. I have not laid off in 40 years but can't play that piece anymore, even WITH dedicated training.
    Sometimes the problems are visable, often they are simply missing synergy between breath support, use of the tongue and embouchure tonus. That is "harder" to see and not a mark of a bad teacher.
    You could be right here, but the first couple of lessons should be closer together. What you want to do here is VERY similar to "Weight Watchers" - a creative breaking of habits and developing new ones.
    The easiest way to get networked is to find a local ensemble where you can "play along". They generally have contacts to the professional world and can report on the success stories.
     
  10. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

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    Feb 20, 2008
    That all makes sense to me. I've been invited to a few things, it's interesting because I wanted to get better - first.

    All of your responses were in line with what I thought (including the first couple of lessons being closer together), EXCEPT I was surprised to the comment about needing a different mouthpiece. I don't think, from the tone that's the only change either. Certainly the question of "breath support" changing with age is a big consideration.

    What's the thing about the mouthpiece change? Is it a question of the lips getting thinner over time? If so that would suggest a smaller mouthpiece?

    Points taken and noted. I'll try to limit my expectations if not my hopes.

    Thanks again.

    I just dropped my daughter off at Winter Drum Line practice, I asked her to ask the music director about a local trumpet teacher. I've also sent out a few other queries.
     

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