Finding trumpet deals on auction sites

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Chuck Cox, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    I like the idea of us being in vogue again. It's about time ! I see a resurgance in trumpet players in the past couple of years. It is hard to sell them the right horn in my opinion. Maybe it's me that puts the '55 Holton or the Coprions above the King 600s and Bach TR300s. I see what people here say about student horns being easier to play for beginners....maybe there's merit to that. But, like Robin, Chinese shiney isn't necessarily better for little Johnny. On another note... I bought a 1978? Connstellation last night off Craigslist for $ 200. I know...I know. It went on eBay last night with a $ 525 reserve. People must love Connstellations because it has 93 views and 25 watchers in less than 24 hours. I reread my description and man I really kind of dogged it with my observation of the " defects ". At least I didn't bust in here and say " I want to give you all the first opportunity to purchase this fine instrument because it's important to me that it go to a loving home ". I'm wishing all the best of luck bringing classic horns back to life and into the hands of trumpet players.
     
  2. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    My biggest problem with flipping horns I rarely find a horn I don't like .... i work everything to see what it can do ... they all have their own sound and way they react.
    It is fun trying to match a horn to a player .... I can't tell you how many emails I get from parents and kids who are so excited and happy with the horns they have bought ... cutting a few bucks off a horn so a family can afford it and then getting a email like that is really a rush. Heck, if I don't have a horn that they are looking for I tell them if they see anything they can call and ask me what I think .... I show them what to look for and what problems a horn could have. They can even bring it by the house after they buy it and I will look it over for them. I would guess you would do the same Chuck. If I knew of anyone looking for a horn in NC I wouldn't think twice about shooting them your way. That's just the way trumpet players roll.
     
  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I think there is something psychological that goes on. Whenever I want to buy something. I go to my favorite auction site. There are always good deals about to end, but not being impulsive and enjoying the hunt, I don't go for them, and watch some auctions to figure out how much things are going for. Somehow those first auctions that I see are always the best deal, I don't know why.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I think others see the same horn selling and then that model comes out of the woodwork. The first is usually the lowest and then it goes up until the market gets flooded. I've watched this happen with the Blessing Super Artist. I got mine for $125. Yes, I typed $125!! It was the 1st Super Artist I had seen in years. My good graces put me in the same town 20 miles away. It was on c'list for 10 minutes and I was the second caller. Had to sweat and pray for 3 days until the guy from Maryland was a no-show. The next Super Artist appeared on e-Bay and went for 2500+. Since then over a dozen SA's have been on various auction sites but the prices are lower/stabilized. Keep your eyes open and be patient.
     
  5. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    I was like that. Nervous when I met a guy who wanted to buy a Martin Imperial that I had on Craigslist for $75. I met him halfway at a Lucky 32 restaurant. When he opened his back door and asked if I would trade even for his Martin. I saw the case....it was a Committee case. My lower jaw felt like rubber. I was hoping he didn't notice my jaw or the chill bumps that were growing up my arms like the plague. I opened the case and........it was a Committee Deluxe with a few dings and frozen valves. He asked me what was the difference in horns for his 12 year old and how much would it likely cost to fix his horn. If only he knew how he was testing my morals. I did the right thing and told him it was their top of the line trumpet and guessed $200 for dings and valves fixed. Then...Then....Then after a pause he said " Would you like to trade ? " I traded without any emotion and thanked him and wished him the best. That's my story of the 1949 Martin Committee Deluxe that I play today.
     
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  6. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    call me religious... or foolish...
    but I think that was Gabriel.... yeah as in GABRIEL ... THEE Gabriel
    and because you did the right thing God blessed you
    think about it.. a Committee .. for trade ...
    HALLEJUJAH !!!
    Karma
    Thanks for sharing I have the biggest smile on my face right now
     
  7. sach7581

    sach7581 New Friend

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    Mar 14, 2008
    Knoxville, Tennessee
    It's all about patience and finding your niche. I buy about six horns a year but bid on about 30. On about 1/3 of those bids, I'm the second highest bidder. I don't end up with the best horns but ones need a little TLC. I put alot of elbow grease into them and get a few dents removed. I play them for a couple of months till I get tired of it and know it works right then sell it for a few dollars more than I have in it. The way I look at it is I'm enjoying it without costing me anthing. The bad part is I end up running up the price for people who do it to make money. Sorry about that but that's the way it works.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Jackson NC
    I don't think anyone who buys at auctions or even from others really will make much money when they've the intent to flip it. Those in the market to buy have also seen the auction and know what you paid for it. Don't be naive enough to believe they haven't. Most items at auctions sell very close to their true market value or at least higher than one expects when someone just has to have it and money isn't a factor. Lots who deal in on-line auctions, for the most part are coping with a "pig in a poke" or "mystery chest" and forget about the handling and shipping costs that exceed their budget. If I were now to buy an instrument for a young public school beginner I've got to consider the cost of rehabbing to playability and still be within the budget of the parent who can barely afford to purchase it as an "last ditch" alternative to a new instrument. It would be unusual for me to make more than a 5% profit, and seldom even that much after expenses.
     

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