First Lesson Teaching

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by keehun, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. keehun

    keehun Piano User

    378
    6
    Feb 4, 2010
    Minnesota
    Hi TM!

    I'm teaching my first student tomorrow.

    I think I have what I want to look for in my head, but any ideas?

    He's a 7th grader (started 5th grade), hasn't had a real teacher yet. I'm not even close to being legitimate enough to be a real teacher, but I'll try my best.

    He seems quite self-motivated. That will also be evident tomorrow...

    I'm thinking about showing him some easy Clark, some easy Arban, and I'm going to just try to inspire him with a Chris Botti CD and a mix-CD I'm making...

    [​IMG]

    Any tips? Suggestions? Anything philosophical in terms of teaching?

    Thank you,
    keehun
     
  2. erd402

    erd402 Pianissimo User

    Age:
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    Mar 21, 2009
    West Virginia
    Since my first lesson was only months ago I just thought I'd throw in my main concern when I started. I was very nervous (I hate playing by myself for other people) so the fact that my teacher is such a relaxed guy made it much easier than I expected. I'd try to make it the most comfortable environment possible for him. If he has trouble staying relaxed and comfortable it will be harder for him to learn and progress during his lessons.
     
  3. keehun

    keehun Piano User

    378
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    Feb 4, 2010
    Minnesota
    Thank you!

    The lesson will be at his house where I felt would be most comfortable for him.

    I will try to be as relaxed as I can to make sure the groove gets established.

    Thanks for the note! :play:
     
  4. mtbevins

    mtbevins Pianissimo User

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    Jan 18, 2011
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Long tones - You can have him pracice at home and in the lesson using a clock with a sweep second hand. Using the clock will help motivate him as he improves. Long tones can be pretty boaring unless you can make a bit of a game out of it.
     
  5. SPFTrumpet

    SPFTrumpet New Friend

    16
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    Nov 30, 2010
    New Jersey
    rather than starting them with things you think they should know, find out WHAT they know first and work with that. I know too many people who have started lessons with a student and basically just started throwing stuff at them without finding out what they're capable of first. Not saying you're the type of person who would do that but its always good to find out just how much they know so you can establish a base and build from there.
     
  6. keehun

    keehun Piano User

    378
    6
    Feb 4, 2010
    Minnesota
    I know the long established value of long tones. I will probably get him to try that.

    I was just reading up on Clarke and Clarke seems to think that long tones were useless... Maybe I'm mistaken
     
  7. keehun

    keehun Piano User

    378
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    Feb 4, 2010
    Minnesota
    Yes!!! Thank you. I needed to hear that.

    All the lessons I've had with pros were basically me playing for them for a good solid duration...

    I intend on spending a good amount of time having him show what he can do and playing certain things...
     
  8. erd402

    erd402 Pianissimo User

    Age:
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    Mar 21, 2009
    West Virginia
    Another thing I just thought of. Do you have much of a music collection? My teacher has been giving me CDs to listen to. I would give him something new to listen to each week. This would expose him to different artists and styles while helping you figure out what he's interested in. It doesn't even need to be a full CD. Have him bring in a cheap flash drive and each week put a few new songs on there and have him listen to them. Have him try to figure out a couple bars of the song to help build his ear, identify key signatures and time signatures from the music, and take a few notes on how its being played. Have him listen to it once just paying attention to the tone, then another time focusing on dynamics, and then again with articulation. It's a fun way to learn how different styles are played and how little things things like the way a passage is articulated can change the entire feeling of a song.


    By the way, how often will you be teaching him?
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2011
  9. keehun

    keehun Piano User

    378
    6
    Feb 4, 2010
    Minnesota
    I'm going to give him two CDs tomorrow. One of Chris Botti and another of a mix. The playlist is in the original post.

    For all the note taking and listening stuff, I will see how he is so far and pull that card when it becomes appropriate! But just listening sounds good for now :)
     
  10. R.T. Swing

    R.T. Swing Pianissimo User

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    Feb 6, 2007
    UK
    My take on long tones. For long tones to be effective there needs to be a flow to them. More often than not I find young or new students just create tension when playing long tones, even in the stave. Flow is what helps, Clark 1 is perfect for this concept. I think of the chromatic run up and down as a long tone. 1flow of breath. I'll start the exercise in a comfortable range for the student and expand. The differences that occur range wise in one line of these exercises is very small. I hope I explain clearly. Think flow not long. Works for my students. (Do listen to him though, you may be surprised.)
     

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