Fitness and trumpet playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by 4INer, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I lost 105 pounds overnight. I still miss her, but my aim's getting better.
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    You lost your commode?! =:O
     
  3. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Good points. As for myself, I feel whole when I'm healthy and I can't keep up even a low exercise regimen without having all aspects of my life negatively affected.

    There are many artists, musicians and others who live quite unhealthy lifestyles and develop as artists while living that way. It does not necessarily impair the full development of their artistic potential (although it can) but it certainly can take over their lives to a point that decreases their performing abilities (see the heroin/alcohol habits of many jazz greats) and it will cut their lives short.

    Excess weight will not undermine certain abilities (such as playing an instrument) but it will do so to other abilities that we may not value as much (such as running or climbing trees). Same for all other unhealthy habits. These habits fulfill a function and can't be shed unless that function is taken over somehow, or no longer needed. That's why so many people fail to keep weight off after loosing it. Any drastic change in one's lifestyle is bound to have major repercussions on all aspects of his life, including artistic practice. The transition away from the habit (s) will be a difficult time, regardless of how much healthier the end result is.

    I'd like to add a safety bit to this: In the case of alcohol, I would certainly not advise anyone to go cold turkey if they absorb significant amounts daily. There is no drug more difficult to withdraw from than alcohol. Not heroin, not meth, nothing. The physiological effects are profound and must be dealt with in an appropriate setting. Alcohol withdrawal is ugly and dangerous; it quickly progresses to tremors (shakes), sweats, hallucinations, paranoid delirium, and to full blown Delirium Tremens for the heavier drinkers. Seizures are often associated with D.T., they can compromise one's airway and that person could easily die if nobody is around to help. Some can go into Status Epilepticus. This used to happen a lot in the old days and was one of the major factors in the creation of the temperance leagues and such. Do not go cold turkey on your own at home. If you're helping someone to go sober, be aware of what's involved and don't hesitate to call EMS. If you've gone sober, try not to fall off the wagon: repeat withdrawals get worse due to a phenomenon called kindling. Every time your brain takes a hit.

    Sorry to have made this my soap box but I work with withdrawing drinkers a lot and believe me it is NOT something you want to be, ever. I'd almost say there is a case for continuing to drink but I also see a lot of liver failure patients and that's pretty ugly too...
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Hope you're not using hollow point bullets!
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Actually there was a British Medical Journal (BMJ) article that looked at the mortality rates of jazz players (Safe Sax I believe was the title), and the article compared all instrumentalist and corrected for variables. Drug use was not a predictor of mortality, and strangely, sax players and an amazingly reduced life expectancy (late 40s) over all others (early 70s). The article blamed circular breathing as the associated feature to explain mortality in sax players.

    Unfortunately, the article did NOT look at alcohol use. I agree with Philippe, as a physician admitting patients with substance abuse issues, the two most difficult to break medically are alcohol and benzo abuse. Alcohol withdraw has a 30% mortality rate alone. It's that bad.

    As for circular breathing, I hope the article is wrong as I use circular breathing quit often on the trumpet, and am approaching 60 rapidly, so I would like to think I have beaten those odds.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Word on the street is that there have been cases of performers using Beta-blockers for stage fright quitting cold turkey and having heart attacks.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    What streets are you walking on? I'll send a street cleaning crew over to spruce it up before others take these miss-directions.

    By the way, I got pulled over for going the wrong way on a one way street. I told the officer: "But sir, I was only going one way". He replied that made sense and let me go (but in the other direction).
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I know cold turkey can cause diarrhea... I mean why do you think menus these days have the * followed by the warning of eating undercooked meat... Duh!:duh:
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    WOW, just wanted to say what an interesting thread this one is. ((by the way I've missed Rowuk, for however long he has been missing)) -- then again, my posts over the last 3 or 4 months have gone way down ------------- since, I've been getting my (heart and mind) connected, instead of exercising aerobically, I've been studying music melody and harmony, writing a score for a community concert band -- and a few songs for some friends in the music industry. NO ONE knows if this is beneficial to my overall trumpet playing -- but it ain't the EXERCISE of the physical body, but rather the mind, music, heart connection. of course, writing music, is damn difficult for me -- so I hope that EXERCISE for the past 3,4 or so months is beneficial!!!! -- NOW off to my total gym, for a heart pounding 5 minute workout!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  10. 4INer

    4INer Pianissimo User

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    The conversations around alcohol withdrawal and beta blockers are interesting to me. Reason being is that I have a head tremor that comes and goes. I've had it for years. The frequency of occurrence increased for several years but has seemed to stabilize during the past 5 years or so. But then I started on the comeback trail and trust me when I say it is impossible to play well when your head is shaking uncontrollably. One of the remedies is a beta blocker. But after hearing the side effects (impotence being one), I passed on them. Then a doctor told me that an alcoholic beverage can sometimes provide relief from the tremor. Up to that point in my life I was a teetotaler, but it really does work. Problem is that it requires progressively increased amounts to do the trick. So I've pretty much given it up and I now have a beta blocker script but only use it if I know I'll be in a high stress situation. So far I've used it twice (in a 3 month period) before a performance and it definitely helped. But back to the main topic of the thread, I'm finding that 45 minutes to an hour of aerobic exercise is helping the tremor at least as much as it is helping with weight loss (5 pounds since the 1st). Now I just need to rearrange a few other things in my life since the exercise program is eating into my practice time and my study time. Less TV, and less FB and blog time come to mind............... :)
     

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