five months playing --Arban

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Hi I am a come back player started around Feb. and I taking lessons with a fine teacher ,we have been using the Aban ....but I am starting to think this book is not a beginners book and might try another book along with Arbans .My teacher started me on it since I had the book available But he gives me slur and long tone exercises to do ,anyone have any suggestions on any good books ? Anthony:play:
     
  2. deadicon

    deadicon New Friend

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    Jun 11, 2009
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    Clarke's Technical studies is also a good one... not really "beginner" but range shouldn't limit you on most exercises.
    Arban's is the **** though. It's a great book to have for beginning or advanced players.
     
  3. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks it is the range thts the problem now
     
  4. DanZ_FL

    DanZ_FL Pianissimo User

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    Jun 16, 2009
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    Arbans is the trumpet bible, of course, but it's not an "everything" book by any means. The fact that you're doing long tones and slur exercises is great. Essential for the fundamentals of your chops.

    You should add the Clarke technical studies book to your collection.
     
  5. deadicon

    deadicon New Friend

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    I give lessons to beginners, and I do tell them to get an Arban's first thing, but I see how it can be boring if you can't play above the staff comfortably.
    Like Dan said, long tones, and slur exercises are a sure bet to get you on your way.
    There's tons of stuff in the Arban that you CAN play however, you just gotta flip around.
    The duets towards the back area good place to start.

    Also, the caffarelli melodi studies book is cool too...
     
  6. giordami

    giordami New Friend

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    Jan 24, 2009
    Phoenix, AZ
    I'm very much in a similar situation as you. I am a comeback player after about 40 years and have been playing since February of this year. In addition to the Arban's and Clark books mentioned, both of which I use, I also do some work out of the Rubank's intermediate book. Long tones and slurs at very soft levels is an absolute must and they have helped me to develop excellent tone and decent range.

    However, the best book I have found for me in developing the embouchure, lip flexibility and breath control has been "Twenty-Seven Groups of Exercises for Cornet and Trumpet" by Earl D. Irons. I think this was mentioned a while back by Rowuk and I have been using it religiously for several months now. I find it slowly, but surely, gets the endurance and range to improve week by week. At this point, I'm up to about an A above staff that's fairly solid. I'm trying not to push it and I'm gradually getting better.

    One thing I have found that has helped me immensely was joining the church choir. The hymns are not too complicated, the range is decent and the ability to blend in with singers and other instruments has proved to be very beneficial to my overall comeback effort. In fact, I didn't think I would be able to handle the endurance aspect of playing at three masses, but to my surprise, I find it quite comfortable and my chops are in good shape after all the playing. There are a lot of rest period between songs, which works out well. I just drink a lot of water when I'm playing and that helps a lot. I primarily play my C trumpet at choir.

    At the end of August, I'm starting in a college community band and I'm looking forward to that. I'll be using the Bb heavily in that band. Since doing the choir work for about 5 weeks now, I've noticed steady improvement in all areas and it's fun. I generally alternate drills between the C and Bb trumpets.

    Hope this helps a little.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The Arbans is just fine all by itself. If you stick with the horn, after a year or so you can add the Clarke.
    What you DO need are more tunes. A hymnbook has 700 tunes or so that are easy to play and that we never grow out of. As we get better, we play with more expression. We do not need tons of range to play them and can get a healthy LOW REGISTER work out with the alto part.
     
  8. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Hello Rowuk , Thanks for your advice ,I am interested where do can I get a hymn book with 700 songs ?? Anthony
     
  9. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    The hymnal that I use quite often is ' The Celebration Hymnal ' By Word Music/Integrity Music '. Full orchestrations of all the contents of this hymnal can also be gotten from the printer. It contains 818 selections. I use it for some simple sight reading exercises, because most of the contents are transposed downward from their traditional key to reduce the problems some singers have with high range notes. This means that those old favorites that I have memorized from playing them so often now become almost like playing a new song.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  10. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Mar 3, 2009
    thanks OLDLOU I will check it out thank you ,Anthony
     

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