Flexibility in different ranges

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    So most of us have experienced the difference in the intervalic distance of partials as we move to higher registers. However, for me, as I move to higher range I find it harder to do lip slurs. I might not be using my tongue properly, but it just feels like it requires so much effort, and I wonder how lip trills and shakes are ever going to really enter the equation at this point. I don't have any real issues with flexibility in my middle/lower ranges (but still can't move quickly in those). Any suggestions?
     
  2. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    You're probably trying too hard.The (harmonics)notes are a lot closer in the upper register than they are in the middle and low registers. Using too much pressure and over blowing will hinder flexibilty every time. Practice these very softly with as little pressure as possible.Keep your air steady and use syllables. Now you say you have no issues slurring in the mid and low registers but can't do these quickly either. The higher register slurs will become easier when you can do them in the lower ranges first. Work on those slurs in the staff first.
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Must be overblowing and pressure, like you mentioned Al. I've recently begun reducing both, so that might help. I'll also work on speeding up my lower slurs (what I meant is that I can slur note to note easily, but not always back and forth quickly, to clarify)
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Part of it is being able to relax without loosing support (a fine balance). And it is nice to have the flexibility to move a little in the mouthpiece cup (which also requires easing the pressure you are putting on your lips with your grip). Then after you get this "feel" keep rehearsing it and go back and forth just as advised in the post by Al Innella.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Mark,
    you are starting in the wrong place. In another post you claim a high F, but now your story sound a bit more realistic.

    Slurs are one of the basic building blocks of trumpet playing. They only really work when the breath support issues are solved and the players are well into solving body use issues. If you can't play them fluidly in the middle and lower register, you HAVE serious issues holding you back (definitely much more than the slurs!)!

    When players have issues with slurs, the most common issue is too much pressure on the upper lip. That comes from lack of synchronization between breathing, tongue, face muscles and brain. The road to solving that is the same as anything else: monitored practice, starting slow and working up according to time available, intelligence and ears.
     
  6. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Hey now Rowuk --- I could play that high F, but I see now that I was using my lips to do most of the work though >.<

    Just got back from practicing using air, and relaxing the lips throughout. I discovered that I'll need to improve my breathe support....No more high F's for me! I've been taking your advice and as much as I can (playing first part in marching band still...ugh) staying in the staff until that is solved. You were correct in the pressure on the upper lip, when I reduced that, relaxed, and used my air, I can now do octave slurs low e to fourth space e, and lower. F to F is a bit iffy still, shows me my boundaries.

    I see now why you always reference air! It feels so much smoother this way. I always said it, but until now didn't understand just how much you must relax and blow in order for the magic to happen. Thanks for that :-)
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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  8. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I have looked around before, but I'll be sure to reread it (sometimes I just skim on accident). I appreciate your assistance!
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    mark, yeah slow soft work can really help you define the problems. At least for me when I start losing out on some part of my playing - I go back to the basics - slow soft notes and lots of soft long tones in the staff. Another thing that help me be proactive in not only lip slurs but flexibility is (octave leaps) ((so do both tonguing and slurring)), and also starting on lets say -- 2nd line G in the staff ---then G-A,G-B,G-C -- up the scale as far as you can go (the 2nd line G to High F if you can -- softly, and patiently --- anyways a few reps of that every few days or so, and in various combinations -- and in a few weeks, well I think that will help tremendously ((keep the pressure light all the way up and down)) ---- well that's my opinion...!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  10. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Sound advice, I'd say as well. I believe that most of you concur on a couple things:

    1) Practice playing softly
    2)Relax, let the air work

    I'm actually going to begin teaching middle/high schoolers in a month or so (I've helped others before, I understand the concepts but sometimes it's easier said than done) I'm very glad to be able to go through these problems myself, so I can give real advice to my future students. I'll be sure to start them off right, so they don't end up like me! haha
     

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