Flutter tonguing to help slurs

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jimi Michiel, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    Hi Manny,
    I've been working a lot in my warmup to get my slurring more even. I tried some of the exercises you gave me, but I have found it particularly helpful to try slurring fifths and octaves while flutter-tonguing. If I don't use my air (and muscles) right, the slur comes out horribly. When I do use my air and muscles correctly, the slur comes out fine.
    Although the exercises you gave me help, it's hard for me to tell if I am doing it "right," whereas it's much more clearer with the flutter-tonguing. Does this make sense?
    -Jimi
     
  2. gringoloco

    gringoloco New Friend

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    When I studied with Jim Darling in Cleveland, he used to have us practice passages flutter-tongued. I think the point was the air support involved. To maintain the flutter, you have to have good support. Could be the same type of thing more specifically applied to slurs.
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Jimi,

    I don't have any experience with that techinique but gringo may well be right.

    ML
     
  4. trumpjosh

    trumpjosh Pianissimo User

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    It's also good for forcing you to rely less on tongue level to play your upper register. Try playing scales from your middle register on up while slurring and flutter-tonguing. See if you can maintain the flutter. Requires a lot of air and chops!
     
  5. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    A different use of flutter tonguing comes from Dave Hickman in developing crisp articulations. My teacher (a Hickman student) used this with me in the Arban syncopation studies. He would have me flutter tongue either an entire etude or certain notes (the beginning of the bar, an 1/8 in 1/8th-1/16th combinations or the quarter in 1/8-1/4-1/8 studies, etc). It worked very well for me, and I use it now with my students that have difficulty achieveing a crisp "pop" on their articulations.
     
  6. Spleeyah!

    Spleeyah! Pianissimo User

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    Apr 6, 2005

    EXACTLY!!

    It's impossible to flutter with slow/unsupported air. When you lose the flutter, it shows where the inconsistancies are in your air (i.e - changing your air for different registers). It exposes alot.
     
  7. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    I used this technique, also to emphasize air support, with Doug Hedwig.
     
  8. thomashooten

    thomashooten Pianissimo User

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    Feb 21, 2005
    Atlanta
    Flutter

    another Idea is to notice the speed of your flutter tongue.
    a fast tight sound could mean your tongue is too rigid.
    I think when you slur while fluttering the speed could increase while sluring up. this could show that you may be using "too much" tongue and not enough focus with the chops or air support
    Just a thought
     

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