For all people looking for afforadable Trumpets from Student,Intermediate to Pro

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by lovevixen555, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. daniel starz

    daniel starz Piano User

    374
    4
    Jan 11, 2009
    wasilla alaska
    I have never been let down by the pros, but plenty of times by the cheap skates.[/quote]
    we get what we pay for , i agree with you 100%
     
  2. GoodMusic@PA

    [email protected] Piano User

    291
    1
    Aug 7, 2008
    Probably one more of those cheap brands that really don't have a brand.... Same thing you see on ebay everyday for only $100:-)
    Buy an Olds Ammbassador or Selmer Bundy, don't buy these... also, no difference between the pro beginner whatever, they are all crap.(IMHO)
     
  3. rdt1959

    rdt1959 Pianissimo User

    224
    4
    Oct 31, 2003
    Georgia
    rowuk;

    For the very first time you have posted something I do not agree with.

    The shop can be your best friend BEFORE something dumb happens.
     
  4. daniel starz

    daniel starz Piano User

    374
    4
    Jan 11, 2009
    wasilla alaska
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2009
  5. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

    5,010
    1,801
    Mar 6, 2007
    Ithaca NY
    Anyone who wants to buy an Asian-made trumpet is free to do so. We don't even lay a heavy inport duty on such items because the overriding philosophy, STILL, is that our market is free and quality products will find their way to the top. Bring on the Suzukis, the Images, the Eastmans, what have you. The real price will be paid by those who favor price over quality and their children who will have to deal with second-rate stuff.

    There was an era, true enough, when "Made in Japan" meant JUNK. At that point in history the Yamaha company had built quality products for years and years and years. As the US auto industry struggled to fend off the invasion of their market by Japanese products, designed and built by a nation of people that had done their homework and figured out how to engineer and produce much better products than we ever imagined possible, other Japanese firms, including Yamaha, jumped on the bandwagon and their products also took a giant leap in quality. Yamaha took already well built instruments and made them even better.

    Because of our free market, the other "new" Asian producers of instruments will be able to sell sufficient product to generate enough capital (which does not go to their workers, much) to invest in design and manufacturing improvements, and their offerings will improve as a result. By not buying American-made instruments we feed that cycle and empower those overseas companies to succeed at the expense of our domestic instrument industry.

    The standard of living in Japan is much higher than in most other Asian nations, where now so many (including some Yanahas) are being made. So with the moving of production to continental Asia, both our workers and their employers, as well as those in Japan, will suffer.

    I clearly see a rationale for buying products made here, even at higher cost if necessary, to prevent the demise of our long-lived and highly craftsmanlike American instrument makers. We don't implement protectonist trade policies which might, in the long run, be in our best interest. So the market's wide open, and the scales are slowly-but-surely tipping in the favor of those who produce goods elsewhere, taking advantage of inexpensive, poorly-regulated labor markets which allow them to pour their profits back into making better stuff.

    It is we, the consumers, who decide the future with our dollars.
    veery

    (Who calls a first-valve tuning slide a "rear" tuning slide, and uses "squared off" to refer to hexagonal? Do they emulate Schilke with the bottom caps to allay your suspicion?)
     
  6. daniel starz

    daniel starz Piano User

    374
    4
    Jan 11, 2009
    wasilla alaska
    It is we who decide the future of our Children ,, buy American !!!

    I am not sorry to say "NO" we will not but Chinese goods , my children know better than to ask or complain .
     
  7. lmf

    lmf Forte User

    1,208
    45
    May 16, 2007
    Indiana USA
    I'm with Rowuk and others on this issue. We like going to music stores and we want to keep them open. The folks that work there have every right to make a living for themselves and/or their families. You work out the best deal with them and when you need warranty assistance and/or service, they are there. If you are a regular customer, you usually find the mark-ups are fair, especially if you want your music store to survive.

    They are entitled to make a profit that's one of the reasons they are in business. They are the ones who support schools, charities, youth sports, bands, other local businesses and the "hometown" economy. Is that so bad? I try to buy as much as I can locally even if it cost a little more. I want merchants in my city to thrive so they don't have to close the doors and leave. Today, everyone is facing hard financial times.

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
  8. shadowpwner

    shadowpwner New Friend

    14
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    Aug 5, 2008
    I got a Suzuki before, beginner's model, and got eh, okay tone. (Got first chair trumpet with it in my middle school band!) Intonation was a real problem though.

    Then I switched to a Yamaha Xeno, and I had to change my embouchure completely. Turns out I (think) I was hitting the air a little upwards to get the good tone I was getting.

    Like other people said, support locally grown food - I mean instruments. :D
     
  9. GoodMusic@PA

    [email protected] Piano User

    291
    1
    Aug 7, 2008
    I agree
     
  10. Le chico

    Le chico New Friend

    4
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    Mar 17, 2008
    i
     

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