For those of you that use the velocity of air...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetMonk, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. TrumpetMonk

    TrumpetMonk Pianissimo User

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    For those of you that use the velocity of air to control range, do you have any tips that would help me do this? Also, would you agree that blowing "hard" air only works up til about an A above the staff?
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    It's not about how 'hard' the air is. It's about the speed. As you go higher, your tongue has to move closer to the roof of your mouth making the "ee" syllable. This narrows the passage for the air, making it travel faster.
     
  3. Harald

    Harald New Friend

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    Yes, that's what my trumpet teacher told me many years ago. I do agree that high air speed is important for higher notes. However, moving the tongue closer to the roof of the mouth only makes the air faster at the site where the tongue is closer to the roof of the mouth - not at the site of the lips or mouthpiece. This is very simply physics. In contrast, I think the tongue at the roof of the mouth increases the resistance of the airway and, hence, makes the airstream more weak at the site of the lips.

    I wonder if some of the more experienced trumpet players can comment on the concept of the "tongue at the roof of the mouth". I would like to know if this concept is generally accepted.

    Thank you,

    Harald
     
  4. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    There have been threads and huge arguments on here about this subject. I don't think there is an answer.

    I move the back of my tongue up when I go higher but then move it back down. I think yeeaa. I try to stay as open as possible. I have a nice big full sound but I can't play double high C.
     
  5. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Another fast air thread??? Oh, Please....SB, the upload page is making my life hard :bleah:
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2010
  6. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Arching the tongue works for me, along with deep breathing and moving the air with my abs.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There is no fast air. It is only a visualization for those that have not spent any time on the physics of what happens. Need proof?
    Play a loud low C and count the seconds that you can keep the tone going. Do the same with high C. If our air were "faster", we would not be able to sustain the tone many times longer than the low C.

    The trumpet is not a megaphone. Our lips only get a standing wave started in the trumpet. The trumpets resistance(reactance) changes with frequency and our lips are trapped between the pressure of our blowing and the backpressure from the horn. That raises their resonant frequency and the pitch that we hear. Less efficient setups make our chops work harder as they are not supported as well.
     
  8. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Moving the tongue does something. I don't know if the air goes faster or the angle of the air or just the cavity is smaller. something changes the buzz which changes the wave.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Moving the tongue changes everything - except the speed.
     
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  10. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    The way Bobby Shew described it at a clinic is that when you play low pitches you use a lot of air that moves slowly, and when you play high notes, the air moves very fast, but there is much less of it because of the smaller aperture it has to go through (the arched tongue and the soft palette)

    While this may not be the exact truth of what happens inside the mouth, visualizing this has helped me with my upper register.
     

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