French Horn...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by G-man-, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. G-man-

    G-man- New Friend

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    Nov 26, 2011
    Hi

    I was just curious about 1 thing. Over the years as I develop my trumpet playing, would I ever be able to play a French horn because my mouth is developed and the mouthpiece is basically the same size as a trumpet (compare to that of tubas/euphoniums etc) and all I would need to learn is the left hand fingering. Or is learning this like learning a trumpet first then asking if that would help me play a violin?

    I love both instruments very much so, and I in a way hope that I dont have to pick one OR the other and hope that by learning either one will help with the other (like, playing trumpet, you can automatically play the cornet)... would it work?
     
  2. Jappe

    Jappe Pianissimo User

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    Jul 3, 2011
    Antwerp, Belgium
    The french horn may have a mouthpiece that LOOKS the same, but it is completely different. It also sits on the lips in a different way. So to produce a decent horn sound, you have to make some adjustements. You will notice that the notes are far more placed together on a french horn, so your slotting will be much more difficult. Lip trills on the other hand are a blast on a french horn. Much easier to produce, so that will impress the horn player ;-).

    A french horn also uses some "stopped" notes. The right hand is placed IN the bell. By shaping your right hand in a different way, the notes will vary in pitch and sound. Also not easy to do. I am certain that just picking up the instrument, putting it to your lips and blow, is not enough to do a reasonable job (and not make a fool of yourself).

    If it's just for fun on the other hand, it's possible.
     
  3. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I thought the same, until I tried one. The slotting is horrible, it took me about 5 seconds to find the note I want to play. There are so many different fingerings that you could probably play a chromatic scale with the first valve down. The mouthpiece is a deep V and totally different. I dont' like horn or mellophone, but you might. I find trombone a lot easier to play, but going from trombone to trumpet feels weird with the mouthpiece sizes.
     
  4. entrancing1

    entrancing1 Mezzo Piano User

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    Buffalo, NY
    It can be done with some practice. Using a horn in Bb rather than F could make the transition easier as the fingerings will be the same if you are playing parts written for Bb instruments. Once you get into horn parts you will have to transpose from the fingerings you know as horn parts are written in F. I enjoy tootling on my cornets and with practice I could be an adequate or better player.

    Single horns in F or Bb can be had very reasonably. $150 - $200.00 a double horn in F and Bb is desireable as the high range is more secure, with better intonation. A playable double horn will start at $400.00 used, Watch for worn valves as rotary valve replate and refits are exceptionally expensive and only worth doing on the best of profesional horns, like the Elkhart Conn 8Ds ( you won't find any of those for $400.00 though). The King Eroica is a good horn as is the Reynolds Contempora. The Conn 6D is a little smaller double horn better suited to chamber work although I played one exclusively for 30 years.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011
  5. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    As a former French Horn player, the approach is different. The tonal concept is different. The key is WAY different. There are notes below the LOW F# (First one below the staff) for another octave and a half or so that will take some time to get used to. Music is written to use these notes... they are not "extra" notes to develop embouchure. The upper register requires REAL precicion to play accurately. Where we relax and blow, you must really concentrate the whole time when playing horn. Trumpet, cornet and flugelhorn are a much better mix as far as I'm concerned.
     
  6. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    E1, I posted before I thought about French Horn in Bb. Thank you. I started on a single in F and then played a Conn 6D until my senior year in high school before I switched to the Farkas model in 1969.
     
  7. entrancing1

    entrancing1 Mezzo Piano User

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    Horn is not for the faint of heart:lol:
     
  8. entrancing1

    entrancing1 Mezzo Piano User

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    I forgot about holtons. The Farkas model is another good horn as is the Merkermatic.
     
  9. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    It most certainly can be done. I too am a part time french horn player. Yes, it takes practice...but what doesn't? Horn is a very beautiful instrument, and I think it is well worth learning to play it!

    Kujo
     
  10. G-man-

    G-man- New Friend

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    Nov 26, 2011
    Thank you.

    Just one last thing on this...

    How would one say a trumpet/Cornet duet together?

    How would one say a trumpet/french horn would duet together?

    What do you think will compliment more?

    I know I have heard things like trumpet and violin doing a duet etc, but instruments of the same family sound 'best' (like trumpet and trumpet). So I wondered how the warm sound of the cornet (still trumpet like) would work with a trumpet and whether or not a french horn would work very well with a trumpet in a duet situation (piano + horn + trumpet)...

    My wife wants to compliment me playing the trumpet by playing an instrument that would really work well with the trumpet. She likes the Cornet because its warm sounding, I suggested the French Horn as it is also warm with the added bass notes capability and it looks elegant. What would be better for complimenting?

    I don't and wont be playing in orchestras etc where certain things are written a certain way and where a specific type of trumpet is needed, so for us its pretty much solo/duet playing, which means the key the instrument (or the choice of instrument itself) is written in is totally irrelevant. We are just looking at what would work sound wise best with what.

    My brother believes the french horn is 'Royal" wile euphonium etc are not 'royal' sounding, trumpet/horn are royal and from that angle I assume they would work very well while cornet is not 'royal' per say...

    thoughts?
     

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