Friction in valve, piston

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by Atfer, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. Atfer

    Atfer New Friend

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Hello, I am new to this forum and to the trumpet. I just bought a Holton T602 on ebay, which actually play pretty well! I know that I have to keep the valve well oiled, but when I put oil in the second piston, it often comme back slowly due to some kind of friction when I make a good pressure on it. If I take out the piston than clean it with a cloth than put it back, it move freely. My question is that : If I clean it after having oiled it and then put it back, can I damage the piston?? Am i better to keep it well oiled but with more (apparently) frinction??? Thanks for your help!!
     
  2. Atfer

    Atfer New Friend

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Just to make sure, when I clean it, the piston is still oiled, but much less than when we put 5 drop of oil on it. Thanks!
     
  3. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    I'd suggest cleaning it and then putting oil in it (do this everytime you play). Sometimes it just takes time for the valves on horns that haven't been played a while to break in. Another possibility is that the nickel on the second valve has worn out more than the other valves, in which case it may feel like it is sluggish- this is something that you can get used to and isn't really a problem. However, the second piece of advice is given assuming that when you say "sluggish," you are referring to how it feels to you and not that the valves are actually sticking.
     
  4. Atfer

    Atfer New Friend

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Thanks, I forgot to mention it. As you said, when I look at the piston, there is one side where the nickel is worn out and the feeling is, as you said, sluggish (It come back more slowly in position). But like I said, having just a little oil in make it come back freely. Could damage the nickel more, or is it ok to do like I said before (cleaning the excess oil)

    Thanks Again!
     
  5. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    Yeah if it just feels sluggish, then there actually isn't really a problem. You could just keep oiling and cleaning as before, and eventually you will get used to the feeling of the valves.
     
  6. Atfer

    Atfer New Friend

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Thanks for your answer! I won't be nervous about damaging the piston next time I play!!
     
  7. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Make sure you press the valve straight up and down.
    Clean the casing with a lint free cloth as well as the piston.
    What kind of oil do you use?
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Sticky valves can be caused by many things. With an older horn, it can just be crud inside. Valve oil can turn this crud into sludge, which then needs even more valve oil to thin out. The horn then really needs a bath to get rid of the dirt.

    The second valve is especially prone to damage when the horn is laid down on the second valve slide size OR band folders are transported in the case on TOP of the trumpet. This puts pressure on the second valve slides and thus onto the casing.

    Correct oiling means cleaning and drying the valve casing and valve before oiling. Oil floats on water. If we do not dry first, the oil has NO contact to the metal and thus provides no lubrication. The result is greater wear.
     
  9. Atfer

    Atfer New Friend

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    Jul 5, 2010
    In fact, when I press the piston straight down, it come back perfectly. It is when I press it a little to the left that it respond <<sluggishly>>, or when I make to much pressure on it. The oil I use is standard valve oil. There is no apparent damage to the piston casing. It doesn't look like there is dirt, but I guess I could try cleaning it. With more practice, I could just get used to it and be more carefull about pressing it straigth down and not with excessive pressure (which is hard when I try to play high note!!) But to help me in the first time, I'll keep cleaning the excessive oil so it won't bother me while playing. Does that make sense??
     
  10. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Pressing the valve straight down is a must. The fix is on the user's side.
     

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