From Rowuk's trumpet pedagogy

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by DiaxII, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. DiaxII

    DiaxII Pianissimo User

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    I'd appreciate if anyone else and maybe Rowuk himself if he had a willingness to do so eleborated on the basic procedure for building up range and tone in an intelligent way.

    I know this is not Rowuk's invention but in one of the older threads (sorry, I wouldn't find it now) he very clearly and concisely summarazied a few steps for intelligent trumpet practice approach as opposed to brutal animal approach especially when related to higher notes playing. It wasn't talk about high range but rather normal range up to high C.

    I'm trying to follow the outlined procedure and it greatly helps me now and what I like about Rowuk's advice that for some unknown to me reason when I read his post I *actually realised* what I was supposed to do. I read similar things a million times before but those were just words to me that come and go as it turned out later but the Rowuk's advice immediately made sense to me and I could see what he actually meant.
    I don't want to mystify or idealize Rowuk's abilities to deliver information to people but we all know there are people who are great teachers and sometimes their one word inserted at the right time and in the right place is worth a thousand ordinary words.

    The procedure was in brief as follows and sorry if I omit or modify any steps (not intentionally) but I doubt I can mess it up as it's very simple but I don't remember timing:

    1. "Buzz" on the MP for *some* minutes (5?)
    2. "Buzz" on the lead pipe (5?)
    3. Do lip slurs (5-10?)
    4. I think that was the most important step and I nearly remember the wording but not exactly: Do soft slurred pianissimo playing in the lower to mid register for (10?) minutes. Then start on the low C and play a slurred pianissimo scale targeting the G on top of the staff. It was advised that if all preceding steps were done correctly a person would be able to go up to D, maybe E without stressing the embouchure with tone only thinning out but stable.

    Now, my question is: since that was a procedure designed with the purpose to prepare a developing trumpeter for next steps, what are the next logical steps for further development in a similar intelligent vein?

    Just for clarification: the origianl poster asked about ability to easily "hit" high C and the whole Rowuk's advice could be summarized as: "Don't hit the high C but work your way intelligently up to the high C."

    The outlined procedure was supposed to prepare the OP for the next steps because Rowuk's conclusion sounded as (citing from memory): "You haven't earned the big high C yet (at that point) but after doing the procedure for a week you'll see a BIG difference".

    Returning to my question: once the difference is noticeable and the procedure becomes routinely accessible what is the next set of steps for developing the notes above D and E leading to at least G and targeting the high C?

    What I mean: the procedure that you see above (and maybe in the original post if you can find that) abruptly stops at the idea in bold, but what should come next???

    It probably would be correct to pm Rowuk and ask him directly because it was his advice but maybe someone can make an "intelligent guess"? :-)
    I simply don't want to bother him.
    Maybe Rowuk himself could also contribute to this and demystify the remaining part if he found a spare minute (or two).
     
  2. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    Last edited: Feb 21, 2013
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Cat Andersons book is about as good a method as I can find. It starts with slow, long tone excercises (a G) for 20 minutes, then builds from there. Withing several weeks of excercises (he prescribes rest time too) you are in a significantly high range.
     
  4. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    a SUBTONE G!
     
  5. smokin valves

    smokin valves Pianissimo User

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    Loads of scales is what I would do. I would play each scale pianissimo (up and down) and slurred followed by legato tounging then staccato tounged. Ascend chromatically (one scale then the one one semi tone above it) until you are at your limit (without straining). I do that every day as part of my warm up and it definitely has helped me with control in the upper register a lot since I started doing it. I don't find it particularly strenuous, as I stop before I find myself straining, so it doesn't affect my other playing, and as a bonus you get really good at scales; you can even do it with minor scales if you want. I have also been told that practicing your pedal tones can improve your upper register, so you might try that too.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Clarke studies pppp but keep going after the last exercise, when you get up there easily enough slurred, try tonguing. The Gordon exercises or any of the ones solely designed for the upper register don't always result in a musical upper register.
     
  7. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    The core of the Claude Gordon teaching philosophy is rooted in the fundamentals and teaching the student to think for one's self.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    uhm - for us mere mortals ---- the Cat Anderson method is a little more difficult than working your way up through the book in several weeks ------ I might suggest it will take a year or so for the older people (those past the ripe old age of 37 ish. NOW maybe it will only take a YOUNG person several weeks ----- BUT I HGIHLY DOUBT THAT!!! ---- but hey give it a try --- and be prepared for many many 3 - 4 hour practices ---------------ALTHOUGH like GM above says, IT DOES WORK!!!! and there are RESTING points within the method (so an actual practice might actually take 5 or 6 hours, with only 3 hours of actual play time ---- HOPE YOUR LIPS CAN HANDLE THAT!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yes, very much a subtone G. Cat says this is the most natural note to play on the trumpet.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Cut a student looking for high notes loose using a high note book without a teacher is just asking for trouble.
     

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