From Rowuk's trumpet pedagogy

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by DiaxII, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. DiaxII

    DiaxII Pianissimo User

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    Thank you for advice everyone, I've been thinking of Clarke's studies (I have a copy) and for the clarification: I'm not after high range above high C. What I need is a stable and solid range up to high C.
    Rowuk addressed in his earlier pedagogical post the low to half of the mid register development principles and I wondered if there is a logical continuation up to high C from where he stopped.
     
  2. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Well, my opinion certainly does not have the weight of the ones from the players who commented above but lately I have found the Bordogni vocalises to be quite helpful, especially the slow ones. It ends up including lots of long notes but played in as musical a way as possible, and still include scale fragments, arpeggios and larger intervals. It does not go much above the staff but demands to keep an even tone through all registers. I like playing them.
     
  3. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    Mr. Gordon's method, Systematic Approach to Daily Practice and his student William Knevitt's 52 week trumpet course are not high note methods like (to some degree) the Cat Anderson's Trumpet Method, though both share many of the common sense idea's of Clarke, that apply to all brass players.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Having a tour guide does keep you out of going deep into dangerous forests.
     
  5. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    So does one's commom sense.
    "A few drops will cure where as a teaspoonful will kill..."
    H.L.Clarke
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not sure common sense applies when the passion and drive of a trumpet player underlies the desire to perform.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually, a lot of what I teach is missed in this thread. The secret is not Clarke, Schlossberg, Gordon or any other method or teacher. Embouchure exercizes or "warmups" have only a small part of the path to success. The amount of "minutes" spent on anything particular is more or less inconsequential.

    What I teach, and this is the core of my personal approach, is the INTEGRATION of body, soul, brains and ears. I start with what I call the circle of breath and a path to better body use. During lessons, I buzz on the mouthpiece, the student buzzes back. In doing this they SEE what I do and emulate (body use/breathing), they HEAR my pitch and loudness their ears tell the brain to tell the lips to play that tone with similar expression (ears, brain, body). We buzz long tones - they FEEL and hear the results of full air to no air. They LEARN to anticipate how their body reacts and PREPARE consequentially. After the buzz on the mouthpiece we play longtones on the trumpet - NEVER leadpipes or B.E.R.P.s. With the trumpet, we add the resonance of the instrument to the list of things FELT, HEARD, UNDERSTOOD.

    As the level of integration increases, we learn to react to additional influences, a metronome, a concept, an attitude, a mood, expectations of the teacher. Articulation is added to help us "speak" through the horn! The goal is a servo loop between all of our senses and brain. The body through "low tension" becomes an optimal medium to transmit and receive. The skills required to "produce" have been commited to memory by hundreds to thousands of repetitions.

    Yes, I have spoken about dividing up daily routine time: 1/3 long tones (mouthpiece/horn), 1/3 slurs like in the Irons book and 1/3 easy tunes like from the Hymnbook. All of those things in the context of the second and third paragraphs. Please understand that I separate daily routine and "preparation" (of lessons/repertory).

    Please, Please, Please do not reduce what I have written here to anything one or two-dimensional.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The power of the teacher, to see the forest through the trees so we do not get lost.


    The word of the Lord.

    Your return is so welcomed. Please stay with us... Truly miss your wisdom.
     
  9. chapmand

    chapmand Piano User

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    Inspirational words. And isn't that what we all need more of? (No sarcasm intended nor implied).
    When it comes down to it, we need to spend time. With patience, perseverance, and some persistence. Inspire. Breathe in. Buzz out.
     
  10. DiaxII

    DiaxII Pianissimo User

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    Thanks, I now can't ask for more. A glimpse of light and dwelling in the dark again. I actually knew that but I wanted to make sure I'm not missing anything at this point. Looks like the important things are realized in small portions along the long road.
     

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