Frustration

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Joe44, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Joe44

    Joe44 Pianissimo User

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    It sems whenever I play in certain settings I just end up regretting it. :oops: I can play fine infront of the concert band (in rehersals) and in lessons or in a group. But, I have a hard time in other settings no matter how much I practice the piece. Espacially in a small roomwith family, friends, etc. I try not to worry very much about messing up and I try not to. I am not usauly shy or anything. Any suggestions?
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Sounds like you're trying too hard - might I suggest a book - "The Inner Game of Music" by Barry Green with W. Timothy Gallwey Pub: Pan Books - Doubleday & Co. Inc., New York. 1987 ISBN 978-0-330-30017-9
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    A lot of times in front of people that you know well you'll feel increased pressure to perform well. This is not news to most.

    Over time people get better at ignoring this feeling, though I know there are some books, such as Ted referenced above, that will help you to relax. I believe one, called "The Art of Relaxation" is another good one, but I'm not sure if that's the exact title. In any case, I usually do a quick five minute breathing meditation when I can before performing in such situations. It helps me calm down. It also always helped me to think positively, and instead of imagining failure, picture success and reassure yourself that you are capable of such success.

    Best Wishes
     
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  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Performance anxiety. Oh, sure, you can picture all the audience in their underwear, but then try playing with a smirking embouchure (or worse, if Kingtrumpet is in the audience - all that vomiting).

    So a great medical alternative is propranolol, assuming you do not have asthma or COPD, are diabetic or are related in any way to Kingtrumpet. Propranolol works great for performance anxiety.

    And if you are Kingtrumpet reading this as related to performance anxiety: Viagra, assuming you do not have a cardiac condition or are on blood pressure medication that may react with this medication
    .
     
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I hear Cialis works wonders too :D
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Joe,
    worrying about messing up, or even messing up is part of the game. We learn to walk by falling down and learn to talk by babbling as a baby. Just keep standing back up and doing it. It gets easier every time. There is no need for medication except forgetting high on life!

    As a closely related note: pick pieces to play that are well WITHIN your capabilities. We can get lucky during rehearsals, but if we are on the edge of what is possible, the additional energy required for a real performance will always come back and bite us.
     
  7. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

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    The people you are closest to are usually the most difficult to perform before. They usually aren't there because they are music fans, and really want to see/hear you, they are there because they have to be there...out of obligation. All of the tensions and conflicts present in your regular lives are magnified when you perform musically. There might even be hidden resentments and resistance toward you playing a musical instrument. They plain-old might think you are wasting your time--and during the time of your performance, theirs as well. Yet, they politely 'endure.' ....Yeah, you're going to pick up on that tension and animosity. ....Or, at least possibly imagine it.

    Performing music is a somewhat-to-very intimate experience. It's so much easier with a group, or band, where you can blend in. So, yeah...I can understand that. I've been thinking about giving a short performance in front of my family....still working the nerve up for it.

    That book sounds really good.
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I had this problem (and still do to some extent) especially in front of family, when one of the family wandered into the practice room I would simply stop playing - eventually I stopped stopping (ain't I a wordsmith?) and gradually the anxiety goes away. I'm not sure if it is the learned ability to focus or the trust I have in my family not to laugh but I gradually improve.
     
  9. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Put yourself in these situations as much as possible. It will be painful at first but that is the only way you will overcome this issue. The only way to practice performing is by performing. Playing in the practice room is very different than performing. I find that I actually perform better in front of larger crowds. For some reason it gives me an energy that I don't get when I play in front of a small group of people. My anxiety goes up when I can see individuals in the crowd, especially if I know them.

    There is so much truth in what Rowuk had to say. "We learn to walk by falling down and learn to talk by babbling as a baby. " Sometimes the babies stop to cry a little, but they always get back up.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Actually, put Rowuk's advice and xjb0906 advice together, before trying any anti-anxiety medication as these two pieces of advice has a high chance of success. In fact, you may want to go into the more stressful situation, with family and friends, and choose only a couple you trust. Then play a piece you already have under your fingers as recommended by Rowuk. Do this often, and with each session, add another friend or family member. With frequency as noted by xjb0906, the flutters and cotton mouth will disappear and you will be able to perform comfortably in any setting.

    Now if you are in the 20-30% that ONLY after trying the above, still are experiencing the anxiety signs of rapid breathing, cotton mouth, butterflies in the stomach, then do ask you physician for a small dose of propranolol, as this will take the edge off of the adrenergic drive that is giving you these feelings.
     

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