Full sound?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Myshilohmy, May 24, 2009.

  1. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Frustration creates anger. You have a lot to work on to get it up to where you want it to be. Work the problems, don't let the problems work you. I/we want to see the same pieces in about six months. You need to figure out how to "sing" with your trumpet. Record yourself and listen to it, study it. Listen if you're recordings are lyrical and beautiful.
     
  2. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    One thing I haven't heard anyone ask you in respect to the Haydn. How many truly fine trumpet players recordings have you listened to? People like Hardenberger(spelling may be wrong), Maurice Andre, or even Marsallis. You will not hear them cut off the end of their phrases with a "tut". The notes are full value. Sorry, but yours are not.

    Yes, I don't hear any dynamics either, maybe it's the recording. Why would you post something with wrong notes? The tempo truly is not consistant.

    Have you ever worked on lip slurs, flexibility studies, lyrical playing, practicing softly? If you have not then your teacher is doing you no favors. Playing something like the Haydn is not the same as playing jazz or playing in marching band. I know you have a fine program in Avon and a great marching band (Grand Nationals Champion), but you don't learn to play trumpet in marching band or jazz band. If all you are doing in lessons is working on what you need for the next concert, jazz band concert, or marching band show, you are not working on becoming a trumpet player. Get with someone who will work with you on the things I have mentioned.

    I am not that far from you if you need help finding someone PM me and possibly I can direct you to some folks that can help you.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Myshilohmy,
    I'll try again.

    When we start any project, we collect information to get a rough idea about what is necessary for resources to finish it. Depending on things like time available and availability of the stuff we need, we can make a decision whether to continue or not.

    The trumpet is the same. We look at a piece to figure out what skills we need to play it, come up with a game plan to get those skills and then make the decision to move forward.

    My first step is to ALWAYS look at the trumpet part and score, see if everything is playable, or what I have to bone up on. I put breathing marks in as well as phrasing. I check to see if the dynamics published are consistent with the score. Then I start to play. Before the first note, I know what is coming up, no surprises.

    I can spend 2 hours in a lesson on the first 4 measures of the Haydn. It is amazing how lazy most players are when they see half notes! In every jury that I have been, those first 4 bars have told me EVERYTHING about what to expect for the rest of the piece. They tell me more about the player than all of the fast, high notes later.

    So like I said, prepare something you are familiar with until YOU are convinced that you have it down. Post that. I then have some decent material to judge your playing with. You see, your rendition of the Haydn had you gasping for breath, no phrases, no dynamics (what we think we did is not usually what the audience gets - dynamics are more of a change in timbre of the instrument - that is apparent even with a video camera! How can I use those distorted bits of information to make a valid decision? Or were you just expecting a "you need to breathe deeper" from me?

    Nope, you need to have a concept before you start playing. If you want, we can go through the process. Pick a really easy piece let me know what it is and I'll go through the steps. That piece can be a simple hymn. You do not need to YouTube it until we are finished. I am convinced that once your head is in the right place, your playing will follow - 100%!
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Myshilohmy - don't give up, all that you have been offered here is gold. Take it in the way it was MEANT - not necessarilly how it sometimes reads. Remember anger comes from frustration - blindness to well-meaning comment comes from, among other things, embarrassment. Three cheers to you for being brave enough to expose yourself to experts the way you have :thumbsup:, but do YOURSELF the best favour - take the words, analyse the intention, grab the learnings, and play music. Remember, you sought comment, and you got it. Take these pieces, and use them as your foundation for advancement from your current place - and show us your teeth :D, imagine having to pay for this level of expertise - you are seriously blessed to have received this sort of attention early in your playing - many of us had to get to 50 or 60 years of age before we found such help - and often we received it too late.

    Analyse, play, listen to yourself, analyse, play, ask questions, analyse, play, and above all - enjoy. :play:

    Well done BTW, you're a braver man than me by far :bravo:.
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Hi Rowuk,
    The only thing I'd add to what you've said about marking the breath marks is to use a red pencil instead of ink or lead. It is much easier to see.
     
  6. Myshilohmy

    Myshilohmy Pianissimo User

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    This is what I've been doing everyday for a warmup this past week.

    5 minutes of deep breathing, I usually use my airmax breather.
    5 minutes of long tones on mouthpiece piano
    5 minutes of long tones on trumpet piano
    5 minutes of lip slurs on trumpet piano
    Then I slur from low c to g on top of the staff, making sure I don't add pressure or have to get louder to force it out as I get higher
    Then I work on anything I might need to work on for school, any pieces we are doing I am struggling with, or I will work on stuff from the Arban's book or Clarke Studies book. Sometimes I work on more lip slurs and double tonguing.
    When I am done with that, I start on second line G and slur chromatically up to G on top of the staff, then back down. Then I start on G on top of the staff, slur chromatically back down to second line G, back up to G on top of the staff. Then I move up half a step to Ab, and go up as high as I can (usually just high C, C#, or sometimes a D). I do each series twice, once fast for range building, and the second time slow for endurance.
    After that I play in my low register, nothing above low c for about 5 minutes. I usually do pedal tones until I feel warmed down.
     
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Those are great!! I think you'll have a great future, you're on the right track. As you know the things you listed are exercises. Now, what you need to think about is "how do I make it more musical"? One thing I do with students when we work on a piece(especially if it happens to have words) is to vocally sing it. At the end of the day you want to be able to "sing" . Remember, the trumpet is just an amplifier. You're the one we want to hear sing!
     
  8. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    I'll add something to Markie's positive comments. I had lesson recently with the great Uan Rasey and he had me do the first etude in the Clarke book, all chromatics. You look at it and think, "that's just a chromatic scale." No, it is not. It's music. I started playing it and he said words to the effect: "make it float, give each note reverance... oh, and play it four times through in one breath." So I got through it 3 1/2x's and good nod from Mr. Rasey. My thought while doing it: I'm a butterfly. Seriously.

    Try singing the piece, or phrases of the piece first BEFORE playing it. You wouldn't sing it like you were in marching band: no phrasing, thick articulation, etc. Make it light, make it happy, give it perspective. Are you sad, are you happy? What are you trying to say while playing? These are things many pros do when playing, and when PREPARING to play. It's not unlike acting. They're attracted to music so that they may elevate it to the level of art, not just notes well played.

    Ed
    Google
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Markie,
    I was told by my music teacher in high school (one of the greatest PEOPLE on earth) that the finest music was written in pencil. Erasable assumes that if we learn something, that we can change our minds.

    I have experimented with articulation in the Haydn since studying a facsimile of the original score and playing some keyed trumpet. I was very happy that my part was not indelibly altered.
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Markie,

    I've taken to running post-it notes through the gillotine (hmm, spelling looks a bit flakey) to create thin sticky strips for use as highlighters on other people's music - when it is to be returned, I simply wipe my hand over the page and all the little strips of yellow paper come off - and they are easier to see than lead pencil marks too. Sometimes we old blokes struggle a bit.
     

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