Fun music to play?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Myshilohmy, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. Myshilohmy

    Myshilohmy Pianissimo User

    147
    13
    Jan 6, 2009
    Indiana
    Does anyone have any fun duets, or just small ensemble pieces in general that are fun to play? I am out of high school, but not in college yet so I still play daily but it would be cool to have some different music. I still get together with some high school friends every once in a while, so that's why I asked for small ensemble music. You can email it to me if you want [email protected]
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Amsden, Voxman part 1 and 2, Brandt, recorder duets, Sachse, St. Jacome. This list should get you started. I am not aware of any of these legal for free. I use them all.
     
  3. brian.hess

    brian.hess New Friend

    18
    0
    Mar 13, 2011
    Port Orchard, Washington
    If you wish to become a more advanced player while learning some insanely difficult duets, Might I suggest that you find the William Vacchiano transcriptions of the Bach Harpsicord concertos BWV 1058, and BWV 1056. I guarantee you will not only improve your technique and proficiency as a player, but if you can find another trumpeter to play the opposing part to what you are playing, you could go on the road. . . . .

    Solo works by Arban, and even the duet and etude selections in the Platinum series Conservatory Method will give you a life time of fun learning. If you don't have a copy of the the complete conservatory method for trumpet by J. B. Arban, you don't know what you missing.

    If you want really heavy playing and exercise books, Technical Studies and Charactoristic Studies (two seperate books) by Herbert Clarke, Max Schlossberg's Lip Flexibility Studies (a green book published by the M. Baron company), Selected Studies by H. Voxman (Rubank) and Jazz Duets by Chas Colin are all excellent books I've studied and still continue to use.

    The crap the schools teach are band methods that don't really "teach" the instruments, IMO. I have had many trumpet and French Horn students that have "learned" from books like "Accent on Achievement" and similar methods that just left them in the dark. I tend to stick too methods that i learned from because they are what my mother learned from, and they are time-honored and cherished methods by all the great trumpet players out there. I have even read inteview and bio information of one of my favorite trumpeters/artists Chris Botti, say that he uses Herbert Clarke and Arban Methods to continue and maintain improvement of his chops and fingers.

    If you decide that you want to get really serious about playing, the best thing to do is to find out what your favorite trumpeter icons learned from and emulate their research. Then find out who inspired them and see where that leads you, You may find more methods or musicians that inspire you in ways you never thought possible. Who knows where you will be in 15 years! Also, surround yourself with others who love to play their instruments. I played with the Farragut Brass in Bremerton for a number of years and played lots of hard British Brass Band music by Gustov Holst, and I also played baritone, French Horn, and Eb Alto horn with them and found each uniquely challenging.

    make the time to play as often as you can, and find inspiration and buy lots of books and play, and find students and share!

    Brian
     
  4. Josh

    Josh New Friend

    43
    0
    Sep 28, 2009
    Sonora, CA
    I agree completely. I hate the stupid band method books.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Constrain those "band books" to those in grades 5-8 IMO, but even then evaluate those in 7-8 who are really ready to play much better ... at let them at it. Yes, to replace my falling apart Arban's that I had in college, when I began my 2006 comeback I bought the Platinum Conservatory edition.

    I'm just home from my 3rd session of tutoring 2 trumpeters who are finiishing 6th grade.
    They've had no prior exposure to chromatics and the rules governing such in the year and 1/2 they've been taking lessons. They didn't know there wasn't any B# or Cb nor e# or Fb, OR what a natural annotation was.

    Honestly, I personally have never worried much about what key I was playing in, and a lot of music calls for key changes. All I needed to know was what notes were b and which were #. I call such a "Symbol Technique" and it works for me.
     
  6. brian.hess

    brian.hess New Friend

    18
    0
    Mar 13, 2011
    Port Orchard, Washington
    That's probably a good way to teach, keeps students from flaking out over horrendous key signatures that sometimes show up in poorly orchestrated high school band arrangements! LOL. But I am still a bit of a traditionalist, and when I teach my private students as I incorporate music theory. I feel that a firm grounding in the building blocks of music and WHY it works and sounds the way it does is just as important at getting through an exercise to move on in a book. I had a student that his parents hired me to "help" him with his playing, and he was slightly learning disabled. . . . and had absolutely NO TALENT WHATSOEVER, but in Washington State they push this "leave no child behind" nonsense and force teachers to place students with no possibility of ever contributing positively to a musical group. . . . I knew kids that were not disabled that just could not play or find rhythm in their soul or even had a tin ear and could not even tell they were out of tune get kicked out of band when I was growing up. I don't get the liberal ways of some of these legislatures and school boards around here. :dontknow:

    Anyway, this kid couldn't read music to save himself and he had be faking it for YEARS. I gave him sight reading material and he was very lost. I also found out that he was more than 80% deaf in his left ear, and he had tubes in that ear so he could hear out of it, but it still affected his ability to really hear what was going on. As it would turn out, he always mimicked the fingerings of other players and only played what he could hear others play. He played in a youth orchestra that required sight transposition on some of the older charts and scores, so you can imagine that he was in dire need of help if he were to continue.

    Long story short, he was a lost cause. I tried to help but was met with resistance from not only he, but his mother, who was constantly making excuses for him. I actually suggested that he find another hobby because he was wasting his time. I'm not sure what it was that put the thought into his head that he could be a half-deaf and non-talented musician and be accepted in a professional life (as this kid was aspiring to join the Army Band--yeah, no kidding) and his US Army MsSgt dad was supporting this notion. . . . . here you have a kid that has been playing for six years and faking playing around other people, and the schools were letting him do this, and his parents were nonethewiser about his inabilities because neither of them were musicians and thought that he should just have "outside help."

    I talked to his band directors and there were a lot of comments made that indicated they were in agreement with me and had tried to suggest to his parents that they were in denial, and that even though they didn't want to discourage him from finding his creative side, they were trying to tell them that it could not be conceivably through music.

    But getting back into the topic of key signatures, what I always found interesting was the suggested keys mentioned in the old etude books.

    Most trumpet players in the States don't need to worry about the key suggestions in those etude books by Kopprasch or Ernst Sasche, they are primarily geared toward sight transposition that is only really practiced by a handful of orchestras that still use outdated manuscripts and scores for horns that are just not widely used in other ensembles. I remember having to sight transpose to Trumpet in A for Rimsky-Korsokoff's Scheherazade because all they had was a part for a trumpet in A. I have a trumpet in A now, but didn't at the time. Sight transposition is skill that French Horn players MUST learn because of the nature of that instrument, but I don't know or ever heard of any secondary schools teach the skill. Most kids that go to college in the states now can't even tell me what note a CM scale starts with (ya, no joke, I inadvertently made a couple of shy French horn girls cry with that one. . . go figure).

    When I was in grade six, I was already studying Herbert Clarke, having breezed through both the John Kinyon methods in 5th grade. I had a student that was 10 years old that also learned from Rubank Books and Herbert Clark Technical studies, and progressed exceptionally well. I also supplemented him with Arban's.

    Youngest student I ever had was 5 years old, and he played out of Rubank Elementary on a cornet and did pretty good (when you could keep him focused, they are a challenge. . . but fun to work with).

    I have taught newbie adults with Rubank methods supplemented by Arban also. Seems like they are a pretty universally acceptable method and have been around a long time. Hopefully they won't get ruined by Hal Leonard buying them up. . . . seems like that's what they've been doing over the last ten years!

    Sorry for such a long tome! I just find it fascinating what schools pass of as an education in music in this State. I have had a lot of students out here from schools all over Kitsap County and Tacoma Area and talk about some eye-opening experiences! :shock: But I have also had some great kids that worked very hard and still play actively today as adults, doing well in their college orchestras and ensembles. Some have gone on to become music teachers. :play:
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

    5,242
    1,791
    Nov 7, 2009
    San Pedro
    this tread has been officially hijacked..
     
  8. brian.hess

    brian.hess New Friend

    18
    0
    Mar 13, 2011
    Port Orchard, Washington
    :D
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

    5,242
    1,791
    Nov 7, 2009
    San Pedro

Share This Page