German folk/polka band - what sound to go for?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by The Weez, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. The Weez

    The Weez Piano User

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Wichita, KS
    Every summer my church puts together a "German folk/polka band" that plays in parades and stuff like that. This will be my first time, and I have never heard them. They said it's mostly waltzes and polkas.

    Now, it's mostly ameteur musicians and I've been promised that I will have no problem making lead (even though I'm a comeback player of fewer than 8wks).

    I'm looking for suggestions on what kind of sound I could go for, something that I could get the other players to emulate so we sound more authentic along with having a good time. Everybody will be playing trumpets I'm sure.

    Should I look into different mouthpieces or anything like that? (cornet, etc?)
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I would not change anything about your playing. The players in Germany are every bit as diversified as in the US, so you will get all sorts of different qualities when listening to an original band. Ernst Mosch, the king of this stuff used leading jazz and studio musicians.

    Put YOUR stamp on it!
     
  3. The Weez

    The Weez Piano User

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Wichita, KS
    Cool. :)

    I get some odd looks playing in church b/c if the song is sort of jazzy I like to ad lib a little, experiment with different dynamics and phrasing, mutes, etc. The church folks aren't used to it but I get thumbs up from the other musicians so I keep doing it. Also the songs usually aren't set up for screamer notes at the end but I sometimes do them anyway during rehearsal "just for me" but then leave it out for the performance. lol
     
  4. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    When I was first trumpet in Eddy Gronets Polka Band I advocated a rather bright sound with very crisp articulation. That was the sound that I wanted. It seemed to work, as we played on national radio every week for eight years and were swamped with gig requests.
    As Rowuk stated, do whatever you feel is right for you. "Put your own stamp on it".


    OLDLOU>>
     
  5. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    I was gonna say like oldlou... energetic, bright, articulated sound. :)
     
  6. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    I guess that I forgot to give any reasons for my choice of sound type for Polka, schadish, or mazurka music. These are all joyful, fun dances. Therefore the music must also give the listeners and dancers, a sense of having fun. For waltzes, the sound should be a bit more refined and flowing with a decent sense of the beautiful melody and the flowing style of that dance. The sound can still be quite bright though.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  7. Snorglorf

    Snorglorf Pianissimo User

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    Nov 13, 2008
    listen to the band Beirut!


    EDIT: Actually everyone should listen to the band Beirut, whether starting a polka band or not.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I gave this more thought,
    the German OOMPAH bands normally have th melody in the flugelhorn and the trumpet parts are like the horn parts in marches - off beats and fanfares. Still, YOUR stamp is the right one. If you are interested in history, you need to research it. A good place to start is with Ernst Mosch, the king of this type of playing
     

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