Get that practice room together

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by rowuk, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    recording a trumpet in any smaller space sounds wimpy. A room with more padding has less destructive reflections and that means an artificial hall reverb will sound better.
     
  2. bockhaus

    bockhaus Pianissimo User

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    Thanks rowuk and sething, you've cleared that up for me. Time to get the tools dusted off and give my practice area a new configuration.
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Robin,

    Do you, perchance, have a blacksmithing background? Mention of the Golden Ratio leads me to such a question as this is a well known dimensional relationship when constructing things like wrought iron gates and stained glass windows.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Ted,
    no blacksmithing. Living in Germany, I have spent some time getting into the architecture of churches that I have played in and many of the finest are built to the golden ratio. I have also built loudspeakers in all shapes and sizes where those proportions are very advantageous - especially with small speakers. I am just a very curious person and am not afraid to tackle things much bigger than I am.

    I studied music, joined an army band in Stuttgart, Germany (1974-1977) made a lot of contacts and have freelanced here (next to my real job) since the mid 70's.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    VB,
    great acoustical spaces do resonate - at very low frequencies however. They also do not cause strong early reflections (< 10 milliseconds) which confuse our brains. The reflections that are significant can be measured in seconds which our brain can easily sort out! Close your eyes in a big church and you still know that you are in a large acoustic space.

    Damping a small room minimizes the early reflections and the resonance in the frequency range that adds coloration and masking of details. This is kind of like the "slotting" of our trumpets - only we do not want the room to be in tune. It should be acoustically neutral or friendly.

    Try practicing in a tiled bathroom and you immediately see how much information is no longer intelligible!
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2008
  6. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    Hmmm, does any oen have any cheap and inexpensive ways to dampen a room?
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Blankets or carpet on the wall, thick carpet on the floor, bookshelves, practicing softly.
     
  8. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Note360,

    A cheap method I am not sure. But, the Owens-corning method is as cheap as a good solution gets. Check with your local home building store.

    It is called the Owens-Corning basement finishing system.

    Owens Corning Basement Finishing System

    One more item on reflected sound. Sixteenth notes get lost in reverberating churches. I played in one regularly and I finally gave up on anything technical. The men with hearing aids would put their hands over their ears and make sure everyone one could see them.

    If any of you consider using an attic with an "A" shaped roof look into the icyene foam insulating method. I have it in my basement and it absorbed sound really well until the dry wall went over it. I would use icynene foam and cover it with fire proof cloth or leave it bare. A man would leave it bare but a woman would cover it. The stuff works great for insulation and sound absorbtion when bare.

    http://www.icynene.com/
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Another important thing to work out is lighting. You need a fairly bright light that does not cast strong shadows. I have a double 25 watt flourescent lights (the ones that are about a yard long) above the stand. That is a very comfortable light.

    You also need to work out a place for the spit. An empty plastic 5 gallon ice cream bucket works just fine and reminds you to reward yourself when you have been good!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     

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