Getting a Private Instructor

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RHSbigbluemarchingband, Jun 4, 2009.

  1. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

    545
    17
    Jan 17, 2009
    Lately my tone has started to suffer, I don't quite know whats going on. I've been doing long tones, lip slurs, and other exercises from arban, and books of that sort. All of a sudden my tone is really starting to decline. I decided to hold off on the practicing and heavy playing for now to make sure this odd change doesn't become a bad habit, or worse something permanent. I have been told im not breathing like I used to, which might be a problem, but im not sure. I decided that maybe getting a private instructor, even for just a single lesson, or two lessons, would be a good choice. I might possibly go longer, but would I benefit from this? Is it a good choice to not practice until this is figured out by a professional, or should I practice still?
     
  2. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

    1,189
    84
    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    Practice , some times things work out themselves,some times not, even if they do, a good private instructor can only make things better and maybe could prevent this problem from returning.
     
  3. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

    Age:
    26
    73
    0
    May 23, 2009
    Dallas
    You could just be going through what I'd call a "dry spell". Whenever my tone suffered, it was because of emotional / life problems I had, or me just not concentrating on my playing. If you can identify anything different that you find with your playing than usual, then that would be the key thing to fixing your problem.
     
  4. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

    1,827
    43
    Mar 25, 2005
    Indianapolis, In
    Getting a good competant private teacher is good for anyone at anytime. They can help you and steer you away from problems.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,964
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    2 lessons cannot "turn your playing" around. The difference between good and great need a lot of fine tuning. However, a qualified, critical eye and ear can give you valuable information about where you stand today. That can help point you in the right direction. The problem with no lessons is that you have no frame of reference. Essentially you do not know if something is bad for you until it is too late.

    Lessons are as much of a motivater as also a quality of character check - are we REALLY playing the things that we should, do we REALLY stick to the daily routine, are we just getting in "face time" or are we seriously paying attention to what we are doing.

    DIY is just accepting the fact that natural selection may or may not be graceful...........
     
  6. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

    545
    17
    Jan 17, 2009
    Well my point with even just a lesson, is I wanna have an evaluation so I know what im doing wrong, normally I just ask my director, but he is currently making our marching band music, and is therefore very busy. But I guess for now ill just stick with basic long tones, I have been playing as quietly as possible, and then just taking each note on a double octave C scale, and just holding them trying to find there greatest resonance, also working on strengthening the embouchere by holding as long as I can. Another thing I've noticed is lately my slotting is not working too. Life hasn't been moving as smoothly as it should, so it could be my problem, but essentially I want the lessons so I can move ahead from where I am, clean up my playing and ADVANCE. My goal is to hopefully have a clean, and hopefully near perfect range from low F sharp up to C above the staff. Nothing above, mainly because I am one who believes if I can clean up that range, the higher range will naturaly come. So I guess time to start looking for a private instructor in my area. Its going to be my birthday present most likely, mainly because it will top off the strad which was my early birthday present, and allow me to light it up!! Oh and one other thing I've noticed along with many others. When im not in actual band, my tone is absolutely fine. When im in band playing with others my tone isn't stable, and i don't center my notes, what is this?
     
  7. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

    1,869
    210
    Oct 16, 2008
    I agree that this is likely a dry spell of some sort, but a lesson or two from a good teacher is a fantastic idea (regardless of the reason).

    Look to local colleges in your area if you're having difficulty finding someone...
     
  8. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    I agree about everything that´s been said so far about a daily routine,
    about dry spells, about keep practising and about about getting a teacher
    take a look at you.

    What Al said about things correcting themselves, I´ve actually experienced.
    When I switched to my present mp, things felt really great. After two months
    I started doublebuzzing. Notes were played in two octaves at the same time.
    I was scarred and depressed, but decided to ride the storm. After about another
    two weeks, things went back to normal, and my tone is now like it was before the
    doublebuzz.
    I also believe in resting. Our muscles sometimes need a day or two off. We´re not
    misbehaving in doing so, we´re just wise!
     
  9. gonzo479

    gonzo479 New Friend

    21
    0
    May 9, 2009
    St. Clair Shores, MI
    RHS,

    just to clarify how long have you been playing on your Strad? Also one thing to think about and a good private teacher could clear this up real fast is that it may be an equipment issue too.

    Jim
     
  10. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

    1,189
    84
    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    Oh and one other thing I've noticed along witmany others. When im not in actual band, my tone is absolutely fine. When im in band playing with others my tone isn't stable, and i don't center my notes, what is this?[/quote]

    This is usually caused by trying to hear yourself in the section and playing too loud, instead concentrate on a centered projecting tone, when you play too loud your sound spreads and goes out of tune , remember they can hear you better in the back of the auditorium if you project your sound, when you play too loud your sound is heard near you but not by the audience.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2009

Share This Page