Getting mellow tone from Bach Strad 43G

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bumblebee, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    You've hit upon a true conundrum. It's like describing what an orange tastes like - without ever having had a lemon or a grapefruit.

    Listen to recordings of the players whose sound you wish to emulate. Listen as much as you can. Get that sound in your head and when it becomes a part of you it will become easier to reproduce it in your own playing.

    You can mellow the 43 with a deeper mouthpiece, or a trumpet/flugel piece like the Curry TF, or by stuffing a sock in the bell, but ultimately you are the one who makes the sound.
     
  2. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Thanks again folks -- Rowuk, I think I agree with you in that I want to produce a variety of sounds by playing them myself. My normal sound at the moment reminds me of the Morricone spaghetti western music (and I worked to get that!) -- now I'm branching out...

    However I'd like to play around with the ringmute concept (though it looks funny!) to see (hear?) what it does.

    Reedy, Veery, the small town I live in didn't have many mouthpieces to try out -- and I'm not wealthy enough to buy many by mail "just to try"... so although the Bach 3C was better for me than my Denis Wick 2 (trumpet 2, not cornet 2) I wouldn't rule out one that might suit me better. (I love the 3C for the edgier sound I get though.) I'll try finding something to put the cornet mouthpiece on the Strad - I'll report back.

    And in the meantime I keep practicing. Thanks - bumblebee
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Interesting thread, thanks Bumblebee.

    Not sure what to think about this issue but leaning towards Rowuk's position, that is to say that most answers lie more in technique than equipment. Just thinking about Miles Davis and his tone as compared to Chris Botti's sound, and I belive both of them are playing a Martin Committee. Very different sounds coming out of roughly the same gear. I guess. (What MP did Miles use? :-)

    I have just the opposite issue, I'm trying to get a brighter sound, so I'm looking for different players to listen to whose sound is on the brighter side (enough Miles already! I need to branch out ...).

    Turtle

    _______________
    "Protect your (raw) brass with TurtleWax."

    1937 King Liberty
    A. Eastman TR400R
    Curry 1TF
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    If equipment didn't matter, you could show up at a British brass band rehearsal with a Bach 43 and a Schilke 13A4a and blend right in with the cornet section...
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Right. Good point, Dale. And the Curry TF (trumpet-flugel hybrid MP) certainly does mellow or darken the sound of my trumpets (compared to the Bach 3C). I'm not advanced enough to darken/brighten the sound just with technique, but that's what I'm shooting for. I guess eventually players arrive at their own unique sound through a combination of technique and gear.

    T

    __________
    1937 King Liberty
    A. Eastman TR400R
    Curry 1TF
     
  6. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    While I agree our sound comes from the player .I also believe equipment has a lot to do with our sound, if it didn't matter everyone would be using the size mouthpiece and model trumpet. We use the equipment to help us get the type of sound we want. You don't see symphonic players like Phil Smith play principal on a Schilke 6a4a and a B6 trumpet, or Wayne Bergeron play lead on a Bach 1B and a large bore Bach trumpet. I'm not saying they can't ,but the sound would definitely be wrong. On this site alone I keep reading about people having a "legit" piece and a "lead " piece, if equipment doesn't alter the sound ,then why change. I'm not saying every change in tone has to mean a change in equipment ,but when looking for one type of sound, when your equipment is built for the opposite,that would call for a change. Physically we can only alter our sound so much, then if that's not enough ,equipment definitely makes the difference.
     
  7. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Maybe you should try a different horn/mouthpiece, but maybe you should try to be your own unique stylist and forget about emulating someone else.:thumbsup:
     
  8. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    However I'd like to play around with the ringmute concept (though it looks funny!) to see (hear?) what it does.
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    Best thing to do is go to ringmute.com and see what people think.
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I think a ring mute muddies up the tone. I tried recording with one a few years ago and wasn't happy with the result.
     
  10. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    dale sez:
    I think a ring mute muddies up the tone. I tried recording with one a few years ago and wasn't happy with the result.
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    Muddied up would kinda be the opposite of bright and clear.
    Sounds like it works but you don't particularly like a darker sound. You are not alone, I prefer bright too.
    However, when I want to do some Miles tunes or get a Botti effect, the ringmute helps me get there by cutting some of the (for lack of a better term) treble from my sound.
    Dale, when you use the ringmute, play the same as you normally would . One of the big mistakes people make with the ringmute is they put it on their bell rim and then play MORE forcefully to get the same sound as they did before placing the ringmute on the bellrim. Just play like you normally would and the trumpet and mute will do the rest.
    Also, just like any mute, it needs to be used in context. I wouldn't recommend using a ringmute and playing Give It One, McArthur Park or Souza marches. However, for mellow intimate stuff it works like a charm.
    I just played a gig on the 4th and used the ringmute and one of the selections was Georgia On My Mind. I focused playing to this one particular older lady and she teared up from the song. I'm sure it would have been acceptable and people would have appluaded if I hadn't used the ringmute.
    However, I don't think I would have been able to reach the stark intimacy that caused audience members to choke up a little without the use of a ringmute. The intimacy would have been overtaken by the brightness.
    I guess muddied up is a good term since removing the clear bright sound while maintaining a traditionally unmuted sound is the goal.
     

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