Getting mellow tone from Bach Strad 43G

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bumblebee, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Semantics maybe, but I prefer a rich sound over a dark one. I was playing a cornet, and the ring muffled too many of the overtones, which I didn't like. To each his own, though.
     
  2. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    My recommendation is to play in a relaxed manner. Don't try to push the sound at all, but just "sing" through the horn.

    Try playing hymn tunes. Many such pieces, like "Amazing Grace" seem to demand a mellow tone to work, and as such should encourage you to play them that way.

    A different mouthpiece would be my first hardware suggestion. I'm (as many of you will have noticed by now) a big advocate for using the largest mouthpiece that one can possibly play. (and no larger!) If you're playing a 3C, try a 3 or a 3B (my wife plays a 1.5B and gets a very nice sound with it). I personally like an even deeper mouthpiece, but a 3 or 3B ought to help without being too much work.

    Of course, for a truly mellow sound, a real cornet with a real cornet mouthpiece (like a Wick 2 or 2B) will do wonders for your sound, IMHO.

    Later!

    Guy
     
  3. Tom W.

    Tom W. New Friend

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    After half a century of playing, I've become convinced that our indivivual sound is mostly the product of our unique personality and physiology and that changes produced by different equipment are largely perception rather than reality. For what it's worth, I played on a Bach 10 1/2C in grade school, a Bach 6 in high school, and a Bach 3 in college. as an adult, I switched to a 3c, then pretty much the whole series of Bach One pieces, then returned to the 3C before finally settling on a 3D. Through all that, my basic sound remained pretty much the same. It would feel different after a switch, but soon evened out to sounding like "me."
     
  4. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Thanks Guy, my cornet is a cheap and cheerful Amati (pretty good but not as nice as my UK-band-issued silver Sovereign was) and the mouthpiece is a Denis Wick 2 -- very deep cup, large throat, sharper rim. However the shank/backbore is shorter and narrower than my trumpet's mouthpiece (but since it is shorter, it is probably not narrower at the corresponding depth within the 3C's shank). I'm looking for an adapter (tried wrapping it in paper and tinfoil but it comes loose) but the initial sounds I am playing on the Strad are very promising.

    As far as changing equipment goes, my local music shop just stocks Vincent Bach, Yamaha and Jupiter so I'll need to travel further afield to find more to try out -- but changing the horn would be a harder decision than changing the mouthpiece.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2010
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Dale sez:
    Semantics maybe, but I prefer a rich sound over a dark one. I was playing a cornet, and the ring muffled too many of the overtones, which I didn't like. To each his own, though.
    ------------
    YES!! That's exactly what the ringmute does. It shuts down some of the high overtones.
    I totally agree. You said it best, to each his own(I hate bucket mutes).
    However,The ringmute does not effect the richness. My sound is still fat round with the treble turned down.
     
  6. Big Daddy

    Big Daddy Mezzo Piano User

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    Once again I agree with Rowuk. :thumbsup:
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I had a rehearsal last night and my colleague had a Bach 43. I asked him if I could try something and he gave me the horn during the break.

    With my "standard" Monette B2 mouthpiece, I was able to play very "darkly" and "smokey" as well as light it up when I wanted to.

    This is great horn that has a wide spectrum of color. If I were playing into a mike like Chris Botti does, I gould get that "sound". No need to buy other equipment or kill highs with a mute.

    Like I often post - stretch YOUR capabilities to the limits. A mute, mouthpiece, horn is fine to increase the color even more, but the first step is between the ears. Your equipment is fine and capable of producing dark to fire - if you are. Once your brain is stretched, then you can get the most out of any hardware. If your approach is not mellow, no equipment will compensate that. There are enough immature flugelhorn players with rough and bright tone because their brains do not understand the essence of what needs to get done.
     
  8. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    rowuk sez:
    Like I often post - stretch YOUR capabilities to the limits. A mute, mouthpiece, horn is fine to increase the color even more, but the first step is between the ears. Your equipment is fine and capable of producing dark to fire - if you are.
    ---------------------
    Ain't that the truth! I've seen and heard people use a harmon mute and I'd swear they were going to blow the thing out of the bell. I absolutley agree. The equipment needs to be used in context and the person needs to have the sound they want to project between their ears BEFORE they start playing.
    I remember this one guy who got a new fluglehorn and brought it to a gig. However, his sound was so edgy and loud that it sucked. It should be noted that he also sucked on the trumpet as he possessed the same edgy, rough and dynamicless sound.
    No amount of equipment will help a person's sound other than intensive listening to others and one's self (recording even if its a cheap recorder)and proper practice.
     
  9. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    This is reassuring to hear -- and with everything else you said I agree fully. After trying out my cornet mouthpiece on the Strad 43 I'm going to add a deeper one to my kit -- and then of course I need to play with the intent I know I'll need to.

    (In the other direction, I can get a nice cutting tone using my shallow Jet-tone T3)

    -- bumblebee
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2010
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Great discussion guys. We're lucky to be able to have it.

    Imagine you're a SINGER, complaining to your teacher: "I just can't hit those high notes ... Think I should try another set of vocal chords? Maybe a new shaped mouth?"

    It's a curse or a blessing (depending on how you see it) for a singer. There's never a thought about changing gear ... it's always back to practice. :oops:

    Turtle

    _________
    1937 King Liberty
    A. Eastman TR400R
    Curry 1TF
     

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