Getting mellow tone from Bach Strad 43G

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bumblebee, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I tell my students quite often when they complain about not hitting higher notes: "then do something special with the lower ones! A week with no improvement is not acceptable!"
     
  2. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Rowuk sez:
    Your equipment is fine and capable of producing dark to fire
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    If you mean just the basic sound a trumpeter creates (their particular voice) on the trumpet alone, then I'd say you are fairly incorrect.
    Remember, I'm talking about the trumpeter's voice they put through the horn, not their ability to play a song in a particular style.
    For example: Even if these people play each other's songs;
    Have you ever heard Miles sound like Maynard?
    Have you ever heard Pops sound like Dizzy?
    Have you ever heard Mendez sound like Andre'
    Have you ever heard Jensen sound like Herb Alpert?
    Here's a few of good ones that can be compared on the spot!
    Does Dizzy sound like Roy Eldrige on the CD Diz & Roy
    Does Donald Byrd sound like Art Farmer on the CD Young Bloods
    Does Maynard , Clark Terry or Clifford Brown sound alike on the CD Jam Session?
    Of course not. While all the musicians named can play in probably any style, they still sound like themselves. "Generally" our voices gravitate to one or the other, a bright sounding or dark sounding voice. The particular sound a trumpet player has little to nothing to do with their ability to have a mind set to play in a certain style. That's another ballgame entirely.
    Some people can pull off both dark and bright( I wish I were one of them). A rare example would be Arturo Sandoval's Trumpet Evolution CD. However, trumpet players gravitate towards "generally" bright or dark. If memory serves me correctly, Wynton speaks often about this dark/bright dicotomy.
    I totally agree that you have to have the mind set to play in any particular style. However, with the right mind set and a little extra equipment such as a ringmute or even a felt bag, a person can kick up their ability to achieve a dark effect profoundly.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Markie,
    why compare the players? ALL of them covered black coffee to raw jalepenos. They all have/had incredible palettes of sonic colors at their disposal. NONE of them need(ed) HARDWARE to set a mood.

    When they did add hardware their minds were already focussed on the end product.

    I am not discouraging hardware, but trying to keep the MUSIC up front instead of band aids.
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    rowuk sez:
    Markie,
    why compare the players?
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    To drive home the point that trumpet players have a voice that they gravitate towards. It will be for the most part dark or bright.
    That's why I said:
    "Even if these people play each other's songs;"
    For example:
    Maynard doing Kinda Blue. While its a mellow song, it'll sound like MF, bright and beautiful.
    Jensen doing Loney Bull. Chances are it won't have the lush sound that Herb has. Beautiful never the less but more dark.
    Miles doing Give It One (Bad example) I pretty sure that song was out of Miles reach.
    But you get my point.
    ---
    The original Poster wanted a way to get a mellow "tone" from a Bach. To me (and Merriam Webster1997), Tone is a vocal or musical sound, esp, sound quality pg760.
    I can't agree more with one of your mantras which basically says:
    "Its BS to to use hardware when the problem is a software problem.
    Mine goes like this:
    "No amount of equipment will make you not suck if YOU suck."
    --------
    If a person has a bright tone and wishes to mellow the "Tone" of a trumpet, they can go a long way towards achieving that goal with a ringmute or a felt bag.
    The upside of one of these devices is that it really works and will mellow and darken the tone of a trumpet!
    The down side is when this type of mute is used, it seems a little easier for the audience to hear (there's not as many types of overtones bouncing around, esp, the high ones).
    This can REALLY SUCK if a person isn't ready for a gig and uses one of these mutes because it feels like every little mistake is heard very well.
     
  5. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Hi Rowuk, Markie,

    thanks guys - the more you write the more I learn - you are talking to one another but I'm getting every word -- great!

    Markie - you are quite correct in that I am trying to play a new (for me) sound/tone, and as part of that am wondering if my equipment is helping or limiting. I am encouraged to think that indeed my Strad is versatile enough, and just perhaps my mouthpiece choice could bear adjusting. I already know that I can go from "rich with an edge" (Morricone or Kaempfert) to "Clear and pure" (Purcell or Clarke) with the same mouthpiece (3C). The Botti sound though is eluding me at the moment but I got rather closer the other night using my cornet piece. My personal tastes these days skew me away from the baroque sound so trying another mouthpiece for what will essentially be only the second time in over ten years is a fairly attractive proposition. It's going to take a couple of weeks to get a new deeper one (the 3C was already the deepest my local shop stocks) so in the meantime I'm pushing ahead with the "practice with intent" bit. It's a lot of fun and is getting me out of a complacent rut I had been tending towards.

    -- bumblebee
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah!!!!!!!!!!!!
    That is MUSIC to my ears!
     

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