Getting started the natural way

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tatakata, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    Oct 28, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Nate...

    what are your thoughts on getting started on the baroque trumpet?

    Models? 3 or 4 vents?

    Price range?

    Cheers,
    t
     
  2. MJ

    MJ Administrator Staff Member

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    Sounds like Trent is getting ready for another horn :D

     
  3. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    Boston, MA
    perhaps. I borrowed Ed's 3 hole Monke and just loved the sound. I'd love to get one if I can sell a few (ha) of my extra horns.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Monke natural trumpets? I've played on some, and the early ones at least, were basically Monkes without valves--the DEG naturals designed by Tony Scodwell are just as accurate, but waay cheaper. Hans Schneider built some killer trompette de tisari, and cheap, too. These instruments, however were built with a "normal" trumpet shank in mind.

    As much as I revere the natural players, I revere the modern performances of Bach by Rilling, although his original trumpeters nicknamed their trumpets "Giftspritze" (poison hypodermics) because they had no problem being heard.

    Pioneering as they were, these Rilling trumpeters, there was some exciting music made--and I would propose, playing a trumpet by Monke, DEG or Hans Schneider is about as accurate in sound as my Scherzer.

    Please enlighten me!
     
  5. Baroquetrumpeterguy

    Baroquetrumpeterguy New Friend

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Tatakata, if you want something better then a home made horn, I have an old Endsley baroque trumpet in C. It uses a modern MP but has a baroque style MP that fits. It only has 2 F holes. One for the key of C and one for the key of D. But I do not have the D crook... I got this from Dillon music along time ago. It has served me well before I got more interested in the baroque trumpet and bought a Naumann Eklund model baroque trumpet last year. You can pm me if you are interested! I have pictures of it aswell.

    Mike
     
  6. BrassOnLine

    BrassOnLine Piano User

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    Here in Europe, people is just going to the original -and right- way.
    Two holes system: one small to blow, second bigger where the sound is coming out.
    Best regards
     
  7. natemayfield

    natemayfield New Friend

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    Sep 13, 2005
    Austin, TX
    Hi Trent-

    Hey, hope you get one- you're perfect for it!

    I started on a one hole Webb trumpet; then switched to 3 hole Naumann; then moved to a 4 hole Egger. They were all important steps for me in getting to know the instrument, and I learned a lot from each. I might recommend just getting the 3 hole Naumann to start out with (or the 4 holer). The Eggers are also nice, but at 4K are quite pricey at the moment.

    I think as far as bells- maybe stick with the Ehe, but the Hass is also nice depending.. Always good to try out a few, but the most important thing is to just jump into it!

    happy baroque-ing!
    Nate
     
  8. tatakata

    tatakata Mezzo Forte User

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    May 29, 2007
    Nate... how did you get into playing the natty?
     
  9. natemayfield

    natemayfield New Friend

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    Sep 13, 2005
    Austin, TX
    Hi Tatakata,

    I've always liked baroque music and history, so I just decided about 3 1/2 years ago to take the plunge and start learning the instrument. It was a relatively easy change for me, and my first project was the Telemann. Although, just like anything else, one must find the right equipment and dedicate the time, money and energy it takes to reach a high standard. There have been many late nights along that way that I've spent practicing until 2 or 3 AM! I feel very strongly that the sound of the baroque trumpet is closer to the composer's original intent, and thus playing the works on original instruments, at the original pitch of 415, gives us a more authentic interpretation. I haven't really studied the instrument with anyone formally, but I've picked up a ton from other players along the way, and also listened quite a bit to recordings for the style and interpretation. (most influential style-wise were Niklas Eklund's "Art of Baroque Trumpet" vol 1-5)

    Back to the Reutter Concerto!
    Nate
     
  10. tatakata

    tatakata Mezzo Forte User

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    May 29, 2007
    wow, only 3 1/2 years? You sound fantastic Nate!
     

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