Getting Started

Discussion in 'EC Downloading' started by josephus07, Nov 13, 2005.

  1. josephus07

    josephus07 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 19, 2005
    Hi Ed (Mr. Carrol...I just can't call someone of your status "Ed," can I? :-) ,

    I'm taking a short break from talking about Berio to ask a question that has sort of been breached in the post by Mr. Rosenbloom, but indirectly.

    If you're moving to a large city and might or might not be going to grad school in your first year there, what kinds of things should you do to get started?

    Let's say that you won't be in school.

    What is the best way to network to get your name out?
    What is the best way to get students?
    What is the best way to get health insurance (find a part time job that offers it, buy it on your own, etc.)?
    Where can you find places to practice if you don't want to disturb your neighbors?

    Things like that...if you have a minute, I'd love to hear your thoughts. I'm not coming at this without any of my own info or thoughts, but again, I'ld love to hear what you have to say. Thanks!

    David
     
  2. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

    2,212
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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    David,

    Let me try to answer your two questions in two posts. Both are interesting.

    . . .firstly about names.

    TrumpetMaster is a community of trumpet players within a community-at-large of musicians. We all face, or have faced, similar issues at various times throughout our careers (I have photos of tackling the "Tune a Day" book as well as playing the Brandenburg), and we are addressing them here openly here while sharing our thoughts and personal experiences. Wonderful, isn't it? We remain students of music (and the trumpet) until we die and "status" shouldn't be a word ever used on TrumpetMaster -- we're all in the same boat (Wilmer's at the helm, Manny's pouring over charts, and I'm manning the life boats).

    Another pet peeve is the use of titles within our community (Dr. Somebody, Professor Thatperson and, the Granddaddy of 'em all: Maestro) as a subtle way of determining class structure. As I mentioned in another thread, Leonard Bernstein would never allow his friends or colleagues to call him anything but Lenny and Simon Rattle is Simon onstage and off. If I visit Dr. Somebody it will be to have my spleen removed, not to play duets.

    Unless you come from a culture that won't allow it, please (everyone) call me Ed?

    EC (this works as well)
     
  3. josephus07

    josephus07 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 19, 2005
    Well, if you put it like that, how can I NOT call you Ed? :-)

    Thanks Ed!

    David
     
  4. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

    2,212
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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Josephus, Part Deux


    Moving to a new city is tricky but filled with opportunity of you play your cards right.

    Suggestions, in no particular order, include:

    o Find out who the working musicians are in the new community and try to hear and meet as many as you can without being a nuisance.
    o Consider calling a few of the above and ask for a lesson as a way to a) get a fresh take on the ongoing work that you're doing while b) giving them the opportunity to be introduced to both you and your work in a familiar, comfortable, environment.
    o There's nothing wrong with taking a job if the salary (and benefits) warrant it. Time management is crucial, however. Protect your practice time. You haven't come this far to sell men's shoes at Kohls. Alternatives for health insurance are easily researched. Do it.
    o Create a simple website (you control, and will constantly update, content) that includes a short biography and longer CV. Say a few things about your teaching philosophy and add lots of photos. Create business cards and a simple flyer detailing your teaching studio and make sure that your webpage is clearly and easily found on them. Bring this to every school, community bulletin board, music store, and church that you can find. Private music instruction is one of the few “growth areas†in our industry. The “No Child Left Behind†initiative has impacted music education in California public schools to the tune of almost 900,000 kids lost lat year alone (one of the “pleasures†of being a dean is reading reports like that). You will be doing young trumpeters-to-be a great service while making a few quid.
    o Find a quiet place to practice that offers total access. I used to trade services (excluding High Holy Days) for a room in the basement of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church (5th and 55th) when I was living in New York. Today my house is built on 6 acres surrounded by trees and I rarely practice. Go figure. :shock:
    o Take every gig offered, even if it's a freebie. Remember that you're doing this to play music, meet fellow musicians, and get your name out there -- not to get rich.

    Where is it that you plan to move?

    Weigh in, everyone?

    Best,
    EC
     
  5. josephus07

    josephus07 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 19, 2005
    Great info Ed,

    Thanks so much.

    I am going to move to Cleveland to be near my fiancee, who is in school there for trumpet (at Baldwin-Wallace).

    I'm going to audition for schools in the area, we'll see what happens.

    Again, thanks for the great info.

    David
     
  6. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

    2,212
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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    David,

    Too bad that Oberlin is undergrad only (strong program). Where else in the region are you looking at?

    EC
     

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