Getting the mold out?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RAK, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Well, I guess to some people's ears the sound may be similar but certainly the differential pressure is not similar. At 35,000 feet the pressure differential is over 8 psi. That is probably as much pressure as if a horse stepped on your trumpet. So, I don't think the average player puts quite that much pressure in. Vinegar probably works ok without trying to blow dry ice through the horn.
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    :roll:
     
  3. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    The reason I use commercial mineral removers and not vinegar is that its a lot faster.
    In general, I don' like the idea of soaking a trumpet to clean it.
    So, the quicker I can remove the minerals/ "gunk" and get the brass rinsed and dried,
    the quicker I can get the horn put back together and safely in its case.

    Greg
     
  4. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Some time ago, there was a thread in TH on using the product CLR (used for household rust and mineral deposit removal) for cleaning. It was used in a solution with water.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Considering the garbage that comes out of some bells at music instrument fairs and music stores, I think we need to soak some players and then send a charge of dry ice through. Don't chute me, I'm just the pianoman!
     
  6. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    CLR works fine.

    Its a lot more expensive than the generic, gallon sized mineral remover I buy at the farm supply store, even though they both work because they contain acid.
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Sometimes you also need to consider the Trumpet Tech Credo - do no harm. :cool:

    Vinegar may take a little more time but it minimises the harm that MAY be caused by harsh chemicals - it is very USER friendly, it leaves no toxic after taste, and you can sprinlkle it on your fish and chips, too. (Aussie chips are deep fried strips of potato square stock 1/2" x 1/2" x 4" - yum with vinegar). ;-)
     
  8. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Ted makes a good point. When in doubt don't use anything that burns human flesh!

    This is why I strongly instruct people to pay attention to how long the solution is in the horn and actually look to see what the acid does.
     
  9. Gaucho Viejo

    Gaucho Viejo Pianissimo User

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    I took a geology class (and lab) once - I vividly remember the lab instructor putting a piece of sandstone (a mineral last I checked) in a bath of vinegar overnight. The next day the stone had dissolved. I'm thinking vinegar IS a mineral remover and probably more "natural" than anything you can get at a feed and supply store.
     
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Vinegar is around 5% Acetic acid.

    I don't know how "natural" applies since it is manufactured not harvested.

    CLR is around 10% Lactic acid plus smaller amounts of gluconic acid, glycolic acid, sulfamic acid, citric acid, and surfactants.

    Lime Away is 14.5% HCL

    Lysol toilet bowl cleaner is 9.5% HCL

    The pH of Vinegar is around 2.5 and the pH of stomach acid (which with its HCl concentration is roughly as corrosive as domestic grade mineral removers) has a pH around 2.
    pH scale.

    All that says is they are both acids, one just works faster than the other because of lower pH. It also means that vinegar is not "safe" and HCl is not "unsafe". How long you allow your solution to eat away at your brass slides can be more important than
    how strong the acid is. So, don't assume any acid is "safe" or "natural".

    Greg
     

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