Getting the mouthpiece to do more of the work.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Local 357, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    No, the question was about mouthpieces, not mutes...(insert kicking smiley face here)
     
  2. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    So yeah, basically Suzuki players can shred, but don't get what they are doing, they might as well be little robots, except then they wouldn't have emotions, but who wants to listen to a childs tantrum on a violin?
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Good point, and bad use of wording on my part. Should have said moot. I will make the edit. How could I survive here on TM without such fabulous editors.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't know what your problem is. The Suzuki school is recognized as one of the finest opportunities to teach string players. They are cranking out some serious players (I know quite a few personally). If you have a bone to pick, be specific. There are too many success stories that prove you WRONG.
     
  5. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I know a lot of Suzuki teachers, friends of mine, that are excellent players. That play professionally. properlly applied Suzuki produces some very fine musicians as they continue their studies into adult hood..
     
  6. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Playing in tune is not something that every one can learn. Sometimes the issue is brain, sometimes it is dedication, often it is missing technique. A wimpy sound can be interpreted as out of tune - even if the tuner says otherwise.

    I need to clarify this. Anyone CAN LEARN to play in tune unless they have a physical or mental problem that keeps them from learning to do so. And by learning to do so they have to want to learn it and they need good guidance from teacher who knows how to teach this. The first thing is that if you are not geting a good sound you can't play in tune.
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    This was great! Loved it! Bravo! Have you ever seen a video called "The Entabulator"? You need to see this. It takes what you just did to the next level. very creative. E mail e mail me and I'll send it ti you. [email protected]
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    we are all different -- my idea is to use the mpc that I like to use --and if it is a Big Bucket mpc, then why not just use that, and develop that? OH, I guess that is what I do, use the big bucket mpc and play and be happy ---- and to get endurance and range, and such -------OH gee, I just put in lots of time, how's that for a solution to big mpc's???? ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Just trying to make a funny - no offense meant. I'm not the grammar police.
     
  10. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    For decades the dogma of trumpet teachers was to put students on as big a mpc as they could handle. The concept was that a big mpc would help the embouchure function correctly. That the probability of developing embouchure problems was greatly reduced. Also most training was geared for a career in an orchestra where a lot of players used really big mouthpieces Starting in the 80s this was slowly changing. While some teachers haven't caught up, the current concept is to generally use a medium mpc until the player is developed enough to make an intelligent choice. I chose my mpc. because I knew I would be playing all genres of music. Symphonic, chamber, Wind ensemble, solo work, jazz big bands, jazz combos. I wanted a rim size that would let me play in all those styles. I choose a Bach 3C rim. Not too big not to small. I didn't worry if it "fit" me. I knew form experience that I would get use to whatever I choose to play. I had a custom rim made by Scott Laskey (Bach style 3C) with different underparts and I've played on it for over 25 years. The only time I play another size is for picc. (Stork 7P) and sometimes for lead a Stork Bach style 7C rim with a shallow cup and tight backbore. I can also use the 7c rim with an underpart if I need to play sustained high parts on my Eb. Or I can use my 3C with different underparts It's always about getting the right sound and "feel" to the set up
     

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