Getzen 490 Bb

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Artemisia, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    LV55 doesn't like AMADO water keys for sure!
     
  2. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Well I did mention earlier that I would oil an Amando water key if I owned anything with them. My Getzen is from 1965 and it has conventional water key levers. I do not think I said they where poorly assembled but I did say they where poorly designed. Their are aftermarket copies that have improved the design by elimanateing the circlip or snap-ring. This snap ring is what often fails to grip well if the cut away area is nto under cut properly or if the material is too much softer then the snaprings material then it deforms the undeer cut area every time you push on the front piston to let water out until it gives way and parts go a flying.Better hope you do not wear bi-focals or tri-focals because you will not find the spring again!LOL Plus when you push on the piston if you do it with only one finger and not finger and thub together to ballance the pressure then you put a lot of force through the joint between the slide and Amondo water key.

    It isnot like I said they are the anti-christ and in league with satan or something off the wall. From an engineering standpoint they are not doing anything that is not already being done with simpler, more effeicent designs. Sure they have a novelty element to them and they have a different apperance but that does not mean they are the best solution for getting water out of a trumpet. So all I am saying is that their are better methods for getting water out of a trumpet that are more reliable and time tested then Amondo water key's. The only legimate claim that can be made for the Amando over a conventional setup is that they have a different look or atestic then a conventional water key system. If I am wrong and looks alone are not the only reason for useing them then where is the proof. It is not like when man went from Bronze age to steel or from wooden valve to modern Perinet valves in copper or some other huge and obvious leap in technology and function. It is a water key to let water out of a tuneing slide and it wither does this better then what came before it or it does not so it is preety cut and dry not alot to discus? It is either better designed then a rocker with a spring and a cork on the end or it is not? Thisis not some flacky issue where something can be right for you but wrong for someone else!!! THis is about design and engineering. I freely admit that it has atstetic qualities if that is ones main goal is to be different and have a different look! IN fact it is so trendy that alot of cheap Chi-Com horns use it but they have improved on it with a screw on the backside inplace of a snapring type retainer.
     
  3. dstrad

    dstrad Pianissimo User

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    Oct 20, 2005
    New Jersey
    I have AMADO water keys on my trumpet, cornet, and piccolo trumpet. I am going to have one put on my Eflat. I have NEVER had a problem with any of them. I have also had traditional water keys and have had the cork fall out on occasion. The AMADO eliminates the well created by the traditional water key. It does make a difference.
     
  4. Artemisia

    Artemisia Pianissimo User

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    Jan 24, 2009
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  5. Artemisia

    Artemisia Pianissimo User

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    Jan 24, 2009
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    Interesting how fast an ordinary Getzen trumpet thread turns into a heated discussion about waterkeys. :shock: ... :D
     
  6. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 17, 2007
    Australia
    Just to clarify the situation:
    The Amado water key was designed by two Italian instrument repairers, Guissepie an Lugia Amado. It was a joint venture and there was an argument which, sadly, split the family and company. Lugia then left the company and founded his own which became known as Amando and went into direct competition all the time claiming that he had been the brains behind the entire operation.
    Only kidding. Couldn't resist!
     
  7. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Indiana USA
    OzBoy.

    Interesting research to say the least. Was the story of the brothers true?

    Maybe LV555 has a horn with Lugia's AMANDO brand water keys which apparently fall apart as opposed to AMADO water keys that are more reliable. I have two horns with AMADO water keys and they work fine. If Lugia claimed he was the "brains of the outfit" his AMANDO keys must not be the same quality as the AMADO brand.

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2009
  8. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Nov 18, 2006
    "I no getta via duct, vy not a chicken?" Chico Marx - Coconuts
     
  9. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Ed,

    Now that was funny!

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
  10. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Now I am sure I would use Generic ones from Allied Supply or Votaw Tools. Seeing how cheap they are to purchase. THey cost less to use so that is one main issue for mass production. Since they save money useing them that is more left in their pocket! Greed is the reason they are gaining popularity. Even another person on a thread about cleaning was adimint that once should oil the Amando system once a month and never allow it to dry out or they stick! Again not an issue with lever style water key's!! They often work for 100 years or more with nothing besides a cork replacement every so often! They look like a growth or a wart onthe end of a tuneing slide to me and they are not as durable as lever warter keys. The most obvious difference though is that conventional water keys actualy do a better job letting the water out of the tuning slide which is the reason they are their in the first place.
     

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