Ghitallia & Best Embochure

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Jun 7, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Discovering your best embochure was mentioned in a previous thread as a basic approach by Ghitallia. I wonder if those ex-students of his could give specific step by step directions about doing that. I know this is a "don't try it at home" kind of thing. But for those of us who have nothing to loose might you comply?

    thanks........tom
     
  2. TheRiddler

    TheRiddler Pianissimo User

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    My teacher studied with Ghitallia for a good while... funny you bring this up - He's giving a small class to us about it on Monday - I'll post some notes on here if you want... I DO know he is a huge advocate of a rolled embochure. He advocates a Bill Adam-esque warm up thing - he does leadpipe buzzing, except instead of on F like the Adam ideas, he suggest buzzing an A on the leadpipe. He also has a similar idea in flexibilities like Adam. He starts on the A and then goes out by halfsteps.... its all very similar to Adam, but done in a lil different manor.
     
  3. thomashooten

    thomashooten Pianissimo User

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    Hi

    This would be probably be the most difficult subject to discuss here.
    Ghitalla did a big embouchure change on me my first year in grad school. It took me quite a while to come back and it was extremely difficult on many levels. There are couple of generalities in forming an embouchure and of course some people make things work that you would think wouldn't just by looking at them. Later I realized that the most important idea to have correct was that the mouthpiece was in a spot that felt secure in a squared manner. Hagstrom once referred to it as having "four points". Ghitalla was really curled in and I remember him showing me what his lips looked like through the visualizer.
    He would make me do a test to see if I was setup right.
    Play a high C on b flat trumpet with your cheeks full of air and using basically no muscle to form the lips. I know this might sound crazy but its pretty cool if you can make it work. His idea was that this would show that your setup was efficient. I also remember Ghitalla telling me to play only from a middle C to high C the first week I changed my face. This could have been just a tailored approach for me.
    I started going down that road of changing a couple students embouchures and it's not easy. However, its such a big part of being a consistent and efficient player.
    The biggest lesson I learned from Ghitalla wasn't about what to do with my face (actually many things didn't work for me) but it was the idea that I WILL get it eventually. Keep working hard, stay open to new ideas, and ask questions that inable you to improve.

    Thanks
    Tom
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2007
  4. jpellett

    jpellett New Friend

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    If you mean that he moves out by halfsteps on the lead pipe than it's pretty far removed from Adam. Even playing an A instead of an F is a bigger difference than it may seem at first...the leadpipe's natural resonance is somewhere around a concert Eb, so the purpose of playing that on the leadpipe is to get in sync with the leadpipe and to do it with the least effort possible (which is why there's also no bending). There may be a purpose to playing an A, but it serves a different purpose than what Adam teaches.

    Jason Pellett
     
  5. TheRiddler

    TheRiddler Pianissimo User

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    ^ Exactly... that's why I said it is similar, but not the same. A lot of the ideas are the same as Adam's... The purpose of playing that concert F on the leadpipe is to get a free, open, resonant, and effortless sound (meeting the horn at its resistance [no push or pullat the horn])... The Ghitalla exercise has the same purpose in mind, as well as some flexibility (I was very skeptical of this at first... but after trying it for a little while, I find it to be true). Like Adam students think of 'wearing the mask' - Ghitalla was an advocate of this idea as well. In the end, I think the ideas are very similar, but they are taught and approached differently... I am not saying one is better than the other, I'm just stating they are similar and have both worked for me. I do them both daily.
     
  6. TheRiddler

    TheRiddler Pianissimo User

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    'wearing the mask' = keeping things set and firm. I think Ron Popeil created a mantra for Adam Students... SET IT AND FORGET IT.
     
  7. TheRiddler

    TheRiddler Pianissimo User

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    I've taken a few lessons with Adam, he has never said it to me - but with others I know he has said it (my current teacher). Adam is a very organic teacher - and each lesson with each student is different. Just like there isn't ONE Adam routine, there is thousands... Adam tailors his approach to each student, although the goals and ideals are the same.

    Also, FYI, Stamp, Terry Everson, and others have used this phrase... so I wouldn't say it is a Bill Adam exclusive, so if it offends you by combining that name with that phrase... I take it back.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2007
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm curious about the leadpipe buzzing of Adam and Ghitalla.
    1. Was the tuning slide inerted into the leadpipe? if not, was a distinction made between reverse and normal leadpipes
    2. Were the A's and F's concert pitch?
    Thanks!
     
  9. robertwhite

    robertwhite Mezzo Piano User

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    For Mr. Adam, playing on the leadpipe meant removing the tuning slide and playing concert Eb.
     

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