Girls

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by T-Money, Jul 1, 2014.

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  1. Jolter

    Jolter Piano User

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    Well, there I go, I went into lecture mode again. Sorry for that. I certainly don't think you're an idiot.
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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  3. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    But who cares?

    My sons grew playing football and rugby. One is a Firefighter, the other was an Army Officer and now works for a Sheriffs Department in the US. Did I influence their upbringing? I'd like to think so. I'm a Dad it's my job.
     
  4. Jolter

    Jolter Piano User

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    It's up to everyone to decide for themselves how they live their lives, and how to raise their children. What I'm saying is, we as adults have a choice in how we raise them. And if we bring up boys to play trumpet and girls to play harp, we should not be surprised that few women play the trumpet. Where our opinions differ seems to be in whether we like that, are indifferent to it, or want to change it.
     
  5. Malamute

    Malamute Pianissimo User

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    During what we Brits call the second world war, there were a lot of women playing the trumpet as well as making munitions and bombs, and being motorcycle messengers. It was seen as keeping things going while the men were away. But after the war , it went back to the old image ...its not feminine to play trumpet etc.
    I took a lot of stick for wanting to play flugel, the boys used to jam their dirty football socks up the bell if i put it down for a second.but now at last it is ok for a woman to play a brass instrument.
     
  6. BachStrad1

    BachStrad1 Pianissimo User

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    There are gender stereotypes for most instruments. Girls are generally drawn toward flute and clarinet and males in those sections are rare and often judged just as harshly as female brass players. It has nothing to do with gender and everything with perception. Listen to a male flute player without seeing him and you will assume he is female. It is simply convention and how we have been culturally conditioned to make assumptions. That being said, there are also personalities that go with certain instruments. A friend and I were asked once, rather tongue in cheek by the questioner if trumpet players and clarinet players usually hung out together. We seriously answered no. I think that girls are less likely to have the type of personality that gravitates toward the trumpet. I fully admit to being somewhat ADD and not housetrainable. As a young trumpet player, I took my share of abuse from the boys. I think it is better now than in the 70s and that most (though not all) musicians don't even blink at a female trumpet player. We're just a rare breed.
     
  7. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    I think this may be true in the US, but certainly not in France.
     
  8. bamajazzlady

    bamajazzlady Mezzo Forte User

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    Why would you find a female version of Maynard disturbing when you had a female trombone teacher who encourage you positively in terms of your music making? I sense irony on your part and encouraging girls and women to play trumpet is less about and not about wanting them to behave like boys and men but it about imparting to them that instruments lack gender.
     
  9. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Rereading what I wrote, there's no irony. Do instruments have gender? I think at the highest level, musician and instrument become one, and the instrument adopts to a certain extent the personality of the performer. I mentioned Maynard, because I sense his style to be more at the aggressively masculine end of the spectrum. But it's by no means the only style available, and there are many other dimensions to explore out there that have no particular gender significance at all.

    Best say no more in case I get myself into even deeper water ;-)
     
  10. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Years ago, I came across a book written by an educator who found a correlation between personalities and instrument types. I misplaced it a while ago, and I think I can now categorize it as lost. In it, the author made recommendations which he found to work very well for his students as far as their enthusiasm for their instrument and their willingness to continue to play it, rather than quit. From what I remember, he wrote that the trumpet worked well with confident, assertive, competitive, motivated, sociable, personable individuals. He mentioned other characteristics that he grouped with other instruments, and I could see a degree of correlation in my experience. I recall that the author said that the trombone worked well with students who were laid back, rather casual about life, and sociable. I wish I still had the book so I could be more accurate about the information within, but I just don't have it at my disposal.
     
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