Going Back to school

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by saponi100, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    Man Coomer and Rowuk that's good advice. I'm in about the same situation, in my 40s and learning trumpet. I just have no illusions about going to a college, there are none near me that teach it.

    Police and nurses and all kinds of occupations that NEVER used to have layoffs, have them now. There's a Depression on. As I was observing to a friend, it used to be there were certain jobs or occupations you could go into, maybe you didn't like 'em so much but the money was so good. Now, all bets are off. Anything you go into, you'd better have your HEART in it. IE as a dentist you may make $20k a year so you'd better really love dentistry ....

    In my own case, if I had the chance to go to actual college for trumpet, I"d jump at it. But I'd not assume there's work out there teaching or anything. That's why I live the way I do now, FRUGAL FRUGAL FRUGAL. I literally live on about $4000 a year. Not a month, a year. That's if I work extra hard. I want to learn trumpet, and think that I may be able to match my "workin' my butt off" income of an average of $10 a day, by busking and playing in coffee shops etc. Maybe even increase it..... imagine averaging $20 a day! For me that's huge money. But that won't happen until I've gone through quite a bit of learning, maybe year or two or three, so in light of this I've brought my costs down from where they were last year, sold the motorcycle, no more showers at the gym (heat water here on the stove and wash up just fine at home) etc. Get those expenses DOWN DOWN DOWN and work hard, I should have a more enjoyable life later. Ultimately a college degree would not make a difference, but if you can do it, I advise it since the more learning the better, generally. Just don't expect that college degree to give you an edge in getting a job, etc. All the old rules, along with the old economy, are gone.

    Enjoy!
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    The answer:

    Finding a gig teaching music is much tougher than finding a gig as a regular classroom teacher. That much is certain. I had changed my major from music education to just standard education for a couple of reasons - the first was that getting a music education degree, at least at the colleges I was looking at going to, required a full-time commitment and I would have had to quit my job to go back to school. A standard education degree doesn't require that until you hit the student teaching phase of the program. Everything else can be done on the side or in the evenings.

    Ultimately it boiled down to a money thing for me - I would have had to have taken a HUGE cut in pay to take a job as a first year teacher. I just didn't want to do that to my family. Part of what I was going through at the time had to do with a job I was working that was ruling my life and was highly stressful. I bounced out of that job into another gig (over three years ago now) and my level of job satisfaction and level of stress dramatically increased and decreased, respectively.
     
  3. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

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    May 28, 2009
    Tewksbury, NJ, USA
    I was unaware of this until recently. When I was in high school many years ago, the only music teachers I ever knew had the same job opportunities and security as any math or science teacher. Now I am in a community band that includes many educators and I'm getting a completely different picture. Before our last concert I overheard a conversation between two of them as they swapped stories about how they juggled part time jobs and temporary appointments in different school districts, all the while trying to keep their heads above water with private students. They are good musicians with impressive degrees. This is happening in northern NJ, an affluent area that spends a lot on its schools. I wonder if it is like this all through the country.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I've had a couple of friends go into music education. Some of them get lucky and land big schools with decent sized programs, but others, specifically elementary level (through 6th grade) get assigned to multiple schools and they juggle a ton of stuff bouncing from school to school - some of which are a fair distance apart. In one instance, someone got lucky and landed the gig at a high school where the director had been there since 1969 and retired after 40 years of teaching at the same school. That's one position, locked for 40 years. I'm not saying that it's a bad thing, just that it puts a music ed major at a distinct disadvantage against their regular education degreed peers when it comes time to find a job.
     
  5. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    I guar-an-tee if a brass teacher set up at Porcella's Music downtown here and accepted walk-in lessons, he'd make a mint. He might make $100 a day, easy. You know why? This area is highly Hispanic. Yep, they have the greatest music, electric bass? Nope! TUBA! They LOVE brass. I was watching one crazy music video at a restaurant here, it was great. The singer is a truck driver, and picked up this blonde hottie, this happens to truck drivers all the time, right? Well, he apparently makes a comment or two, a very slight pass, and she's not having it. Maybe because she's 5'6" and he's like 5'0". So, anyway, from what I could follow, it turns out he's a MUSICIAN! Oh, well! That changes everything! She all but climbs into his lap, while he sings away, accompanied by ..... HIS BAND!! Yep, that's what's in the back of the truck, his band, including a trombone player, playin' away in the back of that truck, swaying around and managing not to put an eye out with that thing.

    Now, is that cool or what?

    In fact the ONLY other trumpet player in this area I've laid eyes on is a Hispanic guy who had gotten his horn fixed up and was picking it up from the music shop.

    A guaran-an-dang-tee that if I had the skills, and became known for being at a given place downtown on afternoons to teach, Porcella's or where Frank (He's good enough to play in bars!) fixes pianos, I'd have plenty of business.

    In any Depression, imagination and initiative are rewarded.
     
  6. Firestas'1

    Firestas'1 Piano User

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    Dec 21, 2006
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  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Same job, different location, different company, and waaaaay different culture. I was working as a database administrator for a financial firm where I was an overhead employee. The pace and stress level was high, not to mention that I was on call, 24/7 on a rotation basis - usually about once every 3 weeks. In that job it wasn't a matter of whether or not you were going to be called upon to fly in at a moments notice, sometimes at weird hours, to take care of business, it was how many times it was going to happen and then trying to figure out what to do to fix the situation.

    I moved to a job where I'm on a DoD contract, so I'm no longer an overhead employee, and I'm actually making the company money, and there is no on-call schedule because none of the systems that I work with are so critical they can't afford to have any down time. So, I work with the military - a culture I was part of for 10 years - the pace and stress level are greatly reduced, and I have a fair amount of job security - as much as anyone has these days anyway.

    So, same job, just different situation, and it changed everything. I got my life back and I was able to continue to do music on the side without it being just yet another stressor.
     
  8. MJ

    MJ Administrator Staff Member

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    Join a community band. Find a private lessons teacher and have some fun.
     
  9. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    Military stuff is doing WELL right now.

    That being said, it's just a matter of daily practice, working with a teacher IF possible IF not then, better have your feelers out to learn all you can.

    I'd love to join a community band, wish we had those around here.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Alex,
    this is the stuff movies are made of, not real life. Even a fine teacher is worn out after a day of spoiled brats with little real upbringing that could care less about their future.

    If you work for a music store, quite often you only have a baby sitting service. The kids do not practice what they should, come unprepared and the music store can't risk you "disciplining" them.

    Getting plenty of "business" does not mean that you want to waste valuable time with those that do not care.

    This is not something "hispanic", it is a unfortunately a worldwide, universal truth.
     

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