Going Mad!!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ejaime23, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. ejaime23

    ejaime23 Pianissimo User

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    Jul 27, 2007
    Houston,TX
    I do a lot of practice tonguing away from my horn, just air and tongue. What exactly do you mean by "don't add sound to the act of tonguing?" Thanks! BTW, that Alborada lick is crazy, even if I was proficient in my triple tonguing, sheesh!
     
  2. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Only use the motion of the tongue , this can be done silently.
    Wilmer
     
  3. trumpethack

    trumpethack Pianissimo User

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    Jun 1, 2006
    Massachusetts
    You can't play the first few studies cleanly?? Then you shouldn't even worry about speed. The key to speed is being able to play cleanly at a "regular" speed. So the real question isn't how to speed up your tonguing...it's how do you clean it up....??

    Can you play the first few pages that we're talking about all single tongued cleanly??

    For a change of pace, play Clarke 2 with triplets on each note, first all single tongued and then at the same speed triple tongued.

    -Hack
     
  4. ejaime23

    ejaime23 Pianissimo User

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    Jul 27, 2007
    Houston,TX
    Well, let me rephrase that, I can play the triplet exercises up to about dotted quarter = 102bpm, which I feel is still too slow for where I want to be. But seeing as how the exercises I'm doing currently are relatively focused on grouped notes (not switching notes, too much anyway), would it be a good idea to move onto those which require constant movement between notes? Hope that clears some things up.
     
  5. trumpethack

    trumpethack Pianissimo User

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    Well, yea, that was sort of my original point. If you can play those first few pages "well" but are stuck at a certain speed like you say...then it's time to move forward. You don't have to be able to play the first five pages at quarter note = 116 before you can move on...

    When you work through the whole section on tonguing you will naturally build more speed. Building your speed up to Nakariakov "land" is going to take time and will end up being more a by product of doing everything really well than just sitting there day after day on the same exercise waiting for it to get faster... which you've obviously experienced since you've hit the proverbial wall.

    That doesn't mean stop practicing those exercises or stop trying to increase your speed, but don't stay stuck on that same few pages just because you don't think they are fast enough. Being able to play all the Arban's exercises at the marked tempos is definitely an END goal. Work through the exercises first just trying to play them cleanly at speeds you can handle. By working through all of them correctly you will naturally increase your speed probably without even realizing it.

    When you're a kid, you don't work on Mary had litte lamb until it sounds like Phil Smith before you move on to the next exercise...

    You have to get things to sound good at the level that your at and then move forward. As your skill improves over the months and years you will go back and "re-work" on things and get them up to your current level. It's just a big cycle that's always going.

    One more thing about actually increasing the speed. Get your single tonguing faster. That is the "fastest" way to increase your triple tongue speed. Try doing the Gekker one minute drill (single tongue 16ths for a minute a day) and get that up to 120... if you can do that, I bet your multiple tonguing speed issues will disappear.

    -Hack
     
  6. ejaime23

    ejaime23 Pianissimo User

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    Jul 27, 2007
    Houston,TX
    Cool, thanks for the tips!
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Slow tongue = massive tongue
    Tom Hooten gave you the key. VERY legato-hardly any tongue movement. The light stroke will let the air do more (blow the tongue out of the way) instead of fighting it. For me, practicing more single tonguing slows my multiple down a bit!
     
  8. trumpethack

    trumpethack Pianissimo User

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    Jun 1, 2006
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    you don't have to practice "more" single tonguing to get it faster...

    the process one goes through in learning to go faster will probably lead one towards using a lighter tongue stroke...
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Intervals are of course harder to multiple tongue. A not-so-fun exercise is to start with open tones and start adding valves chromatically. (0-2-0-2-0-2, 0-1-0-1-0-1, etc.) Looking at the fingers while practicing can help coordination.

    Have fun!
     

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