Good Trumpet for High School?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ap001, May 23, 2011.

  1. ap001

    ap001 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 3, 2011
    Hello,

    I am going into 10th grade after this summer and need some opinions on what trumpets are good for high school. Currently I have a Bach TR710 which is not very nice, I would say. So what is a good trumpet for 10th - 12th grade and would buying a used trumpet be a good idea for this? Thank you all!
     
  2. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Yes! Buying used would be fine. In fact, some of the ones you can find used look and play like new.

    Can you give us an idea of how much you anticipate spending. That will help narrow the selection down for you. Lowest costs would be an Olds Ambassador. Great horn that for used goes for under $200 that would serve someone in high school -though it won't look new (they stopped making them 40 years ago). There are a number we can recommend in the $500+ range. If you go to $1000 or a little more, there are plenty of modern pro horns available (used), like the Bach Strad -what many say is the pro horn that most others are compared to (either better or worse). Kanstul makes a number of pro horns -as so most of the leading manufacturers -Yamaha, Holton, King etc.
     
  3. ap001

    ap001 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 3, 2011
    It doesn't matter to me what the instrument looks like, as long as all the parts work(like valves and tuning slides, etc) and the sound and tone is good. I have scraped together about $250 and I was hoping I could get a quality used trumpet for that price that would last me through high school and would meet the needs of high school. I would be willing to save some more over the summer but really wouldn't be willing to pay more than $500. Maybe $300-$350 is a good price? What would you recommend?
     
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    For $250 you are probably looking at an Olds Ambassador. Look at some on e-Bay. By the way, many say the very best Olds horns are the early ones. If you get one made as late as the 1970's they may not be as good. Also realize that if a horn has "dinks" in the bell etc, but is in good shape otherwise, dinks can be removed at a local music shop relatively inexpensively (usually $40 or under).

    Any horn made by Kanstul is also good. If you do a search, you will see a 609 Kanstul Beeson on sale -think the current bid is $125. It is a good horn. Google Kanstul Beeson and read up on it.

    Others may have some suggestions for you.
     
  5. ap001

    ap001 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 3, 2011
    Okay, and these Olds Ambassadors, since they are so old, would you say that it would be good to take it to a local shop to give a little tune up like a cleaning and dent removal? Also what if the description says the trumpet has a little rust? What could I get for $500, so then I can know if I should wait or not?
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    my personal experience is that the older horns (1970's) are good horns. Last year I bought a King 600 on eBay for $99, and a couple of Reynolds Medalists - trumpets for $45/each. I scored an Olds cornet (1950's) from a used goods/ antique shop near my house fo $30 -- and it is an awesome buy.
    All are good horns -- the antique shop though I was able to touch, see, and play the horn before I bought it.
    so --Ebay, antique/ used goods shops/ rummage sales are all good avenues to look for a horn ---
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    There really isn't much to tune up on trumpets. Dents don't affect the playing of the horn (except in rare situations)-it more of the looks. As long as the slides move, the valves work and the spit valves close, you are probably in good shape. Of course, it won't hurt to have a shop look at it and see if there is anything wrong.

    Olds also has a pro horn called the Super. SOmetimes you can spot one for in the $500 range.

    Before you buy on line, ask if there is anything that keeps the horn from playing well, if it has any signs of red rot (light pink spots-BAD), if valve compression is good (pull a slide out quickly without pushing the valve and see if it makes a pop sound-compression).

    By the way, my son has a Bach Strad which he uses for concerts etc, but plays an Ambassador for marching and at home (in case it is damaged, no large expense).

    I would also check out the Beeson on ebay made by Kanstul (search for Kanstul). It is also a good horn and may go for under $200.
     
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    You can get a pretty decent Yamaha 2335 for $250ish.
    You will need $750+ to enter Bach Strad territory... even a crappy Elkhart beater usually goes $600-700 then needs $400 worth of work.

    Consider a Besson 609 or Besson International. Both made by Kanstul and are great horns... often overlooked on eBay, or misidentified by the seller. The 609's go about $150-200 and the International between $400-700. (last week one went at $378).

    A Kanstul built "Burbank Trumpet" (A Chicago Benge clone) sold recently for less than $400.

    The trick is to be patient and let the deals flow to you... do not get a "This is the ONE" mentality and over pay. There will be another one in a few days! You would be suprised how often a good horn sells well under it's value.
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I was thinking the same thing concerning the Yamahas ... I have a 2330 (2320??) and it sounds great plays pretty easy... valves are nice ... are the Ambassadors generally better (yes I know subjective) than the Yamahas?
    You might go around and try out some horns and tell us which ones you like ... might help with some ball park directions to put you in
     
  10. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I have a 2335 and a 1960 Ambassador... both for sale on local craigslist.
    A guy came over looking for a horn for his 12yo kid.

    He chose the 2335, for $265 over the Ambassador for $125

    The valve action on the Olds was better... but the Yammy is pretty good too. Yammy valves are definitely more finicky than Olds valves. I'd say advantage Olds

    The Yamaha has plastic valve guides. The olds are metal. I'd say advantage Olds

    The Olds had a more focused sound, but a pinch brighter... maybe just more projection. The Yamaha had a fatter sound, maybe smoother slotting. Not as harsh. Advantage Yamaha.

    The Yamaha has a 1st valve saddle... the olds doesn't. Advantage Yamaha.

    In my case, the Olds lacquer was rough, but the horn has been straightened and is free of dents. The yamaha was 99% pristine. Missing the pinky ring for some reason. So, the Yammy was mush better looking than the Olds. This is important to a 12yo.

    Us codgers can appreciate a fine, well playing instrument and overlook it's cosmetic misfortunes/// An 8th grader can't!

    The guy himself said he prefered the Olds if he was buying it for himself but thought the Yamaha was better for his kid.

    In my opinion, If I had to choose today I would pick the Olds over the Yamaha... but that's because I am a 45yo codger. When I was 12... I definitely would have picked the Yamaha over the Olds at that age! (Actually, when I WAS 12, I got a Model 37 Elkhart Strad, lacquered brand new for $700 in 1977 from the Brook Mays warehouse in Dallas).


    The Yamaha 2320 is pretty much an older version of the 2335. With that age you start to get more and more condition problems and those persnickity valves. Pristine ones are harder to find (compared to the 2335's). Even so, a 2320 can be picked up for between $100-150 usually. Now and then one slips by below $100.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011

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