Good Warm up and Cool down Exercises

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by wezley, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. wezley

    wezley Pianissimo User

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    I'm looking for some nice Warm up exercises to do when I'm at home practicing alone I'm looking for something along the lines of lip slurs. I recently had braces put on and the only major thing that they have affected on my was my ability to slur from low to high notes with ease. The other thing I'm looking for are some nice cool down exercises something that will rejuvenate my lips.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    No such thing.

    Just take it easy on range and volume and you can "warm up". Warming down is fluid with ice cubed. If you are tired from playing, more playing can't rejuvenate anything.
     
  3. RobertSlotte

    RobertSlotte Pianissimo User

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  4. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    TM's Wilmer Wise once mentioned his warm down is putting the horn in the case. I ain't bad on this silver plated piece of brass and I don't warm down either. I know more than a few very fine players who don't warm down. In the case and out the door.
    Basically, whatever floats your boat.
    I see no need for pot shots taken at Rowuk, either.
    Rich T.
     
  5. RobertSlotte

    RobertSlotte Pianissimo User

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  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    For a warm down we can play a low note and sing almost the same tone at the same time. The resultant tones treat the lips like a jacuzzi--it doesn't rejuvenate the lips, but can prevent soreness the next day.

    As for a warm-up, I like the Heimat tone concept of Gerald Webster.

    Gerald Webster discovered that when we play a medium high, medium low, medium loud tone on our mouthpiece first thing in the day, the same pitch will come out, our personal "home" tone, or Heimat tone (he discovered this while touring with Edward Tarr in Germany, thus the name). "Personal" means just that, each person has his/her own Heimat tone -- there is no "good," "bad" or "ideal."

    Some players start their warm-ups on c below the staff, then work their way upwards, but that makes any thing above c below the staff a more or less a high note. Rather than starting in the lower register, consider starting at your personal Heimat tone and expanding from there. That gives us the feeling of having more low tones to play, and fewer high ones to struggle for.

    Hard to diagnose things over the Internet, so the best we can do is make suggestions for you to experiment with.

    Have fun!
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Wow, me in the same paragraph with 3 monster players. Thanks Robert!

    Fact is, all of those "great players" have developed a certain style of playing over many years. They do the things that their body/mind tells them because they have learned to listen to the tiny voices in themselves.

    Just because they use certain procedures does not mean that that 1) applies to others without the abilities or 2) that the reason that they give is even the real one.

    A warm down can have psychological value. It has nothing that actually changes the flexibility of the muscle. When muscle is tired, it must rest to regenerate. When our MIND is tired, we have different strategies to compensate for that. One could be a warmdown.

    For the player that does not yet "hear" the tiny voices, I will maintain that there is no benefit to "cooling down". Advanced players that hear the voices need to feed them even if the process is different that they claim. The previously mentioned great players are not great because of the cool down. They are great because of the intense energy that they have learned to focus through the mouthpiece. After a couple of hours of energy, I can understand the package of body and mind needing a routine. The reason is not physical however.
     
  8. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    My take ...
    When I practice especially if I end on range exercises my warm down is just 3 sets of descending arpeggio from C down to pedal C
    I "feel" like it loosens up my muscles so they don't tighten up. If I don't the next time I pick up my horn my chops might be tight.
    It appears that the pros don't need to ... interesting
     
  9. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Robert, perhaps I did miss the point.
    Your English is excellent (better than more than a few native English speakers here) and I took your words literally. I believed it to be a bit of not-so-nice sarcasm when it is likely just a bit of tongue-in-cheek humor.
    Rich T.
     
  10. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    My warm down, if you want to call it that, happens in the car on the way home. It involves me buzzing my lips in a VERY relaxed fashion, using no facial muscles, and it sounds like a cat purring quietly. I only move air w/ no flexing on my face so the sound is probably in the low pedal tone range. I do this for about 5 minutes and it relaxes my facial muscles. Like getting a massage. I don’t seem to have that “Fatigued” feeling the next day. I would love to just be able to just stick my head in a Jacuzzi for about 10 minutes but the model car I drive didn’t come with one and I can’t hold my breath for that long anyway. So this relaxes the muscles for me. I don’t PLAY a warm down, I agree with above posts that your muscles need rest.
     

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