Graduate School

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bear, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2004
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    Hello Ladies and Gentlemen,
    So, due to recent developments and the situation of the American economy (i.e. not finding a jod in my locale) I am starting to think about grad school. So, could we start a discussion on schools in the US that offer a PhD/DMA in music (concentration undecided)? Knowing that I've missed all the deadlines, I can have a jump start on next years addmittance and do some serious R&D.
    Admittingly, I would like to gear more towards big band jazz and specificly lead playing. I know UNT has a rep to put out beasts, but I'm not sure if I'm that confrontational. I am not of a competitive nature.... Unless I'm on a range, HA!
    Anything y'all could recommend me checking out? I know Kansas has a great jazz program.

    Thanks for your input,
    Tim
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2009
  2. Phil Kersh

    Phil Kersh Pianissimo User

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    Provo, Utah
    When it comes to Grad school, is the mantra "it's not where you study, but who you study with" still in effect?
     
  3. DanZ_FL

    DanZ_FL Pianissimo User

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    Jun 16, 2009
    Clearwater, Florida
    Is Northwestern still a highly regarded place to do trumpet grad work? I'm so out-of-the-loop.
     
  4. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

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    Tim,

    I live about twenty miles from UNT, and let me tell you, it has got to be the best musical college I have ever seen. It's produced countless legends, even many that joined Maynard's band. If you would like to major at UNT, I'd suggest something like "Jazz Studies", as that would be more performance based than anything else. Just coming out of UNT, you will already have many gigs vying for your attention - especially if you come out near the top.

    Good luck, where ever you go!
     
  5. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Phil,
    I don't know if that mantra is in effect in the academic world, but I've seem to run into it in the secular world. I.E. I have a forklift liscence and was vying for a job. Even though I have several years of experience, another guy got the job cause he was the kid of Fred (name substituted).

    Psuedomyn,
    I've thought about UNT really hard, thanks for the affirmation.
     
  6. Phil Kersh

    Phil Kersh Pianissimo User

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    Feb 28, 2008
    Provo, Utah
    Those #&%@! forklifts! What I've always seen is that you are heavily influenced by who you study with because of their sound, style and don't forget, connections! Then again, it probably has a lot to do with how good you are. You can study with some great teacher and still not cut the mustard in the market.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Going to a big-name school would put you out there with a bunch of other big-name school grads when it came time to apply for a job. If you want to be different, and want to stand out, having a DMA in Big Band lead playing most likely won't get you the gig--if you can do it anyway, why study it for a PhD or DMA? Kobe went pro out of high school!

    Schools will want someone that, yeah, sure, can play the heck out of a Thad Lewis chart, but they'll want someone who feels comfortable leading the brass in a regional orchestra, coaching a brass quintet, able to hang with early-and-avant garde types, and can teach theory and history as well; maybe even arranging and composition. (A good friend uses the title cut from Zappa's Joe's Garage in his first history lecture of the year to show how styles change.)

    I'd be looking at a school that would strengthen my weaknesses as a musician. Sometimes a great teacher can do that, sometimes a solid program will do the same. It ain't so much the school, but how you work it that should matter.

    Good luck!
     
  8. Phil Kersh

    Phil Kersh Pianissimo User

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    Feb 28, 2008
    Provo, Utah
    That really resonates with me VB. Someone that I really respect decided that in order for him to really grow and develop, he needed to do something that didn't come naturally or come easily. He ended up choosing the subject that everyone saw as his weakest (English) and he ended up getting a Doctorate and becoming a very successful writer. I realize this is an exception, but I also think it points out that we all have the potential for greatness. We just need to focus, work hard, and maintain balance.
     
  9. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Rgr that both VB and Phil. Good stuff. I have considered the "choose a school for your weakness" and had thoughts along the lines, etc. I do understand it's what an individual makes out of the school/teacher. I am more versatile than just lead playing. I just always come back to that because it is my love. I've been in orchestras, taught classes as a GA,chamber/avante garde groups, etc as you mentioned VB. Nothing get's me going like big band... except quintet, I have a tone of fun with that as well. Keep the discussion going. Good stuff.
     

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