Great British trumpet teachers?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bloomin Untidy Musician, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    I have been a member of TM for some months now, and i have been absolutely "bowled over" by all the information regarding the great American trumpet teachers e.g. Caruso, Stamp, and Claude etc. These disciples of the trumpet are unfortunately (in my experience) rarely ever preached about in England; I suppose this is in part due to the transatlantic divide. My questions are, do we have "disciples of trumpet teaching" within the UK? If so, who are they? What is their teaching philosophy? :-o

    Also, is there any British trumpet teachers that are skilled in preaching the gospels of Caruso/Stamp/Claude?

    Sinfully yours

    B.U.Musician
     
  2. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    B.U.M.,

    John Miller at thr Royal Northern in in Manchester was a student of Vincent Cichowicz, and his teaching reflects well what he brought back from Chicago.

    Cheers,
    EC
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    The Wide Brown Land
    Unfortunate acronym, what?
     
  4. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    BUM ROFL,

    There is many great teachers in UK and as Ed pointed out, John is one of them...in addition to that John is a very funny person. I studied with Murray Greig, had private lessons with Rod Franks, James Watson and Maurice Muprhy. I haven't done with them any gordon/clarke/arban/caruso etc, but I consider all of them to be great trumpet teachers.
     
  5. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Lucky man Trumpetnick! I find it very interesting that you never done any Arban with them considerng they are all ex-brass banders. Would you be able to give us an incite into what you learnt with these teachers?

    On the Maurice Murphy's LSO podcast, he said that he doesn't rate himself as a teacher, and that teaching was never really his thing. Is Maurice being modest?
     
  6. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    BUM,

    I had only one lesson with Maurice, actually spent more time with Rod and Jimmy. Many great players in london say about Maurice that is better to make him play instead of listening his directions. I know that he is not that much keen on teaching, but I think that he is doing very well as a teacher, if you catch him to teach you, which is not that easy. The only reason for getting a lesson with him was probably the fact, that I was supposed to have a lesson with Rod, but he had to go to the hospital for a surgery, so he introduced me to Maurice with the request to replace him for 1 lesson...

    Now, what I have learned?

    Rod Franks:

    Given the fact, that his daughter is a masseuse (physio-therapist or something similar) he has often told me things about my posture. What I found really interesting, was that he stressed on few occasion the fact, that it is not only important to play well, but also look well while playing. Sounds very british, don't you think? Looking elegant while playing well...that was part of his trumpet philosophy. He also helped me with my mask, which improved my high register. Another thing I have from the Rod's session is the improtance of having an "archive" of different artculations and different kinds of vibratos

    Jimmy Watson:

    He adored to make me play long phrases...Actually, one of his favourite exercises was to make me play the first phrase of Hindemith sonata in one breath.

    Murray Greig:

    Methodology: He was very consistent on emphasizing on the importance of starting to learn every peice slowly and GRADUALLY increasing the speed to the desired one.

    John Miller:
    Very funny guy...given the fact, that I was a postgraduate student at RNCM at the time, he did not give me too many tips. He was often saying something like: "Well, you are a big boy and should be able to sort it our by yourself"...He was giving tips, but only if he thought that I would not find the answer myself...In a way, he was motivating students to find their own way in finding their own trumpet playing routine

    I actually had also one cornet lesson with Roger Webster, where we played exclusively the Arban Carnival, which I played on my final recital for the PGDiploma at RNCM. The only technical tip he gave me was that I could relax the mask a bit more when playing a cornet. All the rest were interpretation stuff.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2008
  7. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Complement:

    Most likely, the reason for not spending much time with them on arban and other trumpet basics books, is that private lessons with those guys were rather expensive. Bassicaly I would get 1 hour with guy X and would prefer spending that time on some solo pieces or orchestral exceprts. We still worked on basics, but through those pieces. I don't know if this is wrong, but that's the way most of my lessons with them went. I remember one trumpet class led by John Miller about warm up and technical routines, but as it was not very different from any other good teacher I studied with, I did not take a special attention to. It was bassicaly the same what Jean-Fran├žois Michel taught me at the Conseratoire de Fribourg (Switzerland) or Maurice Andre during his masterclass 2004 in Zurich (Switzerland)
     
  8. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Cheers Nick for spending the time to answer my questions!That was most informative.:-)
    The best trumpet teacher i have ever had was a little know Italian trumpet player in Leeds. I believe he played in some of the big Italian Orchestras. Although his English was a little rusty (at that time), he was a very knowledgable, and passionate teacher.
    He had a superb technique, and was a huge advocate of disciplined Charles Collins, and Thibaud practise.
    After spending 2 1/2 years of banging my head against a brick wall with another teacher (prior to the Italian teacher) i was at the point of packing in playing. Even with his inspirational lessons (and no money student at the time) I decided to pack it in.
    5 years later i returned to playing as a cornet player in a brass band and have never looked back since. In many respects i have become my own best teacher. By reading the tips on this website, and other musicians advice i have practiced hard and can play stuff now that i couldn't even contemplate all those years ago.
    Maybe the reason that i never succeeded all those years ago was the fact that i was a poor student unable teach myself based upon the advice i was given. As one of the pros said on this website said,"i have never taught anyone how to play the trumpet in my life."
    Getting back to my original question of great (cornet/trumpet)British teachers, has anyone ever been taught by some of the "old school players"
    e.g. Jack MacIntosh, Jimmy Shepherd, Harry Mortimer, Willie Lang, or (although he isn't old school ) Elgar Howarth?
     

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