Grrr...High notes!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Passion, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009

    Do you know why when I first change mouth pieces, high notes were easy then got rough?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If you switch back, the same thing will probably happen. The reason is wishful thinking and more room for the lips when you use pressure to get the high notes. The pressure wiped you out. That explains why it died so quickly.

    Don't mess with success. You had a piece that worked for you and had no real reason to change. You've learned your lesson (I hope!). Now go do the right thing!
     
  3. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    Dont you worry, ill switch back to 5C right away.

    Also, you know Rowuk, I can tell from your posts and others about you that you're very awesome at trumpet and know alot of stuff. Thanks for existing.
     
  4. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    Oh yeah I forgot, the reason I switched was I heard rumors if you switch, you play higher. Also I lost my 5C mouthpiece somehow. I took my brothers older 3C mouthpiece and loved the results. Then I found the 5C mouthpiece in my shoes two days later. No idea how it got there.:dontknow:
     
  5. mkmtrumpeter

    mkmtrumpeter New Friend

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    Jun 17, 2009
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    As a general rule, I wouldn't listen to any of your high school buddies' advice on quick fixes when it comes to range. There are none. ALWAYS take the word of a band director or private teacher over the word of your inexperienced gossipy peers.
     
  6. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    I have to fully agree with this statement. There are many in my band that told me that if i've gotten this far on a 7c i should switch to a 5c or 3c and I would increase my range. My question to them is why should I switch if my current mouthpiece is working perfectly for me? Some think that having a 7c is less professional, but why switch? I was considering it, even to fix range issues, but decided to go with teacher option, so if your having problems talk to your teacher, but if they aren't helping you look for someone else.
     
  7. mkmtrumpeter

    mkmtrumpeter New Friend

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    Jun 17, 2009
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    EXACTLY. What's wrong with playing a standard 7C? Nothing, that's what! I switched off the 7C after a few years because for a number of reasons, particularly the extreme change in my embouchure and approach as a result of having braces in my earlier trumpet years, the 7C wasn't giving me the sound i wanted at all. However, if you're progressing well on a 7C and are happy with it, there's no reason to change. It's not like if you take an audition and play better than everyone else, they won't take you because you play a 7C. Really, the numbers and the brands don't matter. Your sound and your comfort level when you play is what matters.
     
  8. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

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    The only time I've ever seriously used pedal tones were in a warm-down. I find them very useless as they don't seem to do anything in improving my chops. If you could explain their use, or their benefit other than to impress a few friends (because they certainly have never turned up in any music I've ever played), I would gladly like to hear the reason for sticking them in a practice session. Again, the only times I've ever felt like using them is when I can feel myself tightening up too much from playing above High C, and I was to loosen them up but still keep playing.

    The pencil exercise only helped me with firm corners, but even then, I don't use the same "embouchure" with the pencil as I did with my playing chops, so it didn't help me at all, just burned my corners haha. It might do some good in helping build strength in those muscles which could lead to a firmer embouchure, but then again (as I said in my personal case) they were two different embouchures, so all it would do is confuse my muscle memory.
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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  10. mkmtrumpeter

    mkmtrumpeter New Friend

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    Jun 17, 2009
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    The idea behind using pedal tones as an integral part of range building is that you don't do what you're doing. If you play pedal tones regularly and use the same kind of set and air flow in your upper range, then you shouldn't have to worry about tightening up too much.
     

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