Grrr...High notes!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Passion, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

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    I'm still not seeing the point in pedal tones, I'm sorry mkm. When I said "the only time I use pedal tones is if I catch myself tightening up" I meant that I would not use pedal tones hardly ever, but only as a remind to myself that I should keep loose. The tones would just be a quick fix for loosening the chops after I realized, "oh shoot, they're tightening up!". This hardly ever happens.

    Is there any definite good use to pedal tones.
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    For myself, working on pedal tones really helps tune in the ear. Especially if I'm running an all brass sectional and the lows are having a rough time. Every heard the expression, "the lower you can play the higher"? That concept is talking about the usage (quantity) of air. To get a nice big round sound on pedals (instead of sounding like a goose or an elk in heat) you must use a lot more air. That useage of air really helps me when I do what I do in the high register.

    Play a 3rd space C, with the same air play a low C, then a pedal C. The pedal doesn't speak very well using the same "air" as a 3rd space C. However, play a nice big pedal C, play a high C (2 ledger lines above staff) and then a DHC and you can "feel" how that air from the pedal transfers to teh DHC.... Goodness, I hope I didn't confuse anyone. Anyways, works for me.
    Just remember, anyone can play high. Not everone can play high musically.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Yup.

    The valved trumpet acts like a trumpet only within a limited range: (using open tones) from (written) middle C to g (four ledger lines above the staff).

    If you can play that high, you've noticed that a half step higher doesn't speak well. Why? The bell design that allows a trumpet to sound like a trumpet rather than a mouthpiece connected to a megaphone acts like a megaphone connected to a mouthpiece in the extreme upper and lower register. That is why we all (regardless of stylistic orientation) worship those guys who, through a combination of embouchure strength and "impulse of will" (a Bruno Walter quote, by the way) manage to make the trumpet sing beyond its limitations.

    In other words, notes above the four-ledger-lined-above-the-staff 'g' (gee, it sure was easier back in the day when we call this a "double g"!) are impossible! The trumpet tells us, "nope, not my gig," just as the oboe gives up and passes the torch to the trumpets at anything above c above the staff in baroque music.

    Weird, but cool. Trumpeters can do the impossible!

    Same with pedal tones. To bark out and hold these equally imposible tones in tune we are dealing not with a trumpet, but a megaphone with a trumpet mouthpiece attached.

    The same muscles are involved in both "impossible" registers of the trumpet.

    If you could train any sort of muscle by straining every muscle in your body or by relaxing and finding the right one, which would you choose?

    Viva pedal tones, viva Vulgani!
     
  4. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

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    That makes perfect sense, thank you for clearing that up. I believe that is the best answer I've ever seen on this forum, however Vulgano, your answers are normally pretty concise and differ from everyone else anyway.

    However, now that you mention it, I was never able to play pedal tones until I started trying to play above a High C! (I dunno what you're ranting about, I've always called four-ledger-G "High G" since the octave on a piano starts at C...)

    Again, thank you Vulgano.
     
  5. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Vulgano, I like analogies my friend... I've always been of the mindset that the "instrument" is teh players chops. The horn simpy acts as the amplifier. Nice to see some affirmation on that.
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Hi passion,
    I would like to welcome you to the first in what will be many mouthpieces you will collect as you develop and learn what fits. I have around 15 in my collection. Weird thing though, I always seem to end up using the same mouthpiece I was using all along.
     
  7. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Obsession?
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Ahhhh Passion - we all have our obsessions. Some of us are even obsessed with our passions. ROFL Oooooh, did I say that out loud? :oops:
     
  9. deadicon

    deadicon New Friend

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    good explanation vulgan
     
  10. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Oh, how used I am to people making jokes about my name. I do it sometimes myself, lulz. Passion is seriously my name in real life, and as soon as I get to college I'm going by my middle name, Merie.
     

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