Guidance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ricecakes230, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
    Texas
    I know most of you guys are experienced trumpet players and have felt the highs and lows of trumpet playing.

    But way back in the years, did you ever feel like no matter how consistent, smart, or efficient with your practice, you just seemed to be getting no where. You also realize that it's been happening for a long time, but you still see that you aren't that much better than the guy in your section who doesn't really practice as consistent as you. Even sometimes that lazy guy may even be a little better than you. You never get that feeling of glory, that you deserve after so much hard work. People see the other lazy guy as a better trumpet player than you, but deep down you get so angry because you know he doesn't put in as much work as you.. and it isn't like you practice the wrong ways, you have a teacher, you're consistent, smart, and efficient. I don't know man..
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    We can call it a plateau. We can spike upwards and then our ability seems to hit a wall. Keep at it, and wait for the miracle.
     
  3. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Fort Wayne, IN
    What are your trumpet playing motives? Why do you play? Is it to be "better" than the next guy or to be the best musician you can be? Musicianship requires personal focus and dedication, and lots of persisting in intelligent practice in the face of all sorts of opposition. The more we obsess over comparing ourselves to the next guy, the less relaxed and musical we are in our trumpeting efforts.

    Feelings of glory? We are not curing cancer here. One hundred years hence, few will know or care about what you or most of the rest of us ever did with our trumpets. What can matter greatly to each of us is how well we lived. As musicians this means knowing with confidence that we have put our best into our preparation and performance consistently.

    Jim
     
  4. Gendreauj

    Gendreauj Piano User

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    Aug 26, 2013
    Metro-Detroit
    Hi,
    I am not an experienced trumpet player. Although I have felt the high and lows of life. What changes have you considered to get out off this funk? How do you get back to enjoy playing
    again? It sounds like you want a drastic change.

    What style of music gives you the most pleasure? Is it possible to play in another band, were the focus is on fun?: i.e a jazz band/ Marichi band. Also try playing outside of your comfort zone: totally different music. When I lived in Houston, loved to hear the Marichi trumpet music.

    Other than you teacher, do you have any musical mentors? Find some musical mentors outside of your current social circle.

    Is your trumpet a good fit for you? Have you tried out other trumpets? C trumpets or cornets etc? Did you use any mutes?

    Do what is right for you not anyone else. Keep us informed about how any changes you made work out.


    I am a beginner at the playing the cornet/trumpet and have no expectations- other than having fun.

    Jim J.

    Carl Fischer cornet
    Yamaha Professional cornet
    Future trumpets: Cannonball and P.Mauriat
    Cornet mouthpieces: 2 1/2 c, 3 c, 7c
    trumpet mouthpieces: 1 1/2 gold colored Maestro brand, Bach 3 C
    mutes: Straight mute, Cup mute
    Future mute: Wah Wah mute
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Some people are more "natural" players and progress faster than the rest of us. That said, some facets of trumpet playing are easy to improve significantly in a short time span, and you can see the improvement. Other facets gradually improve over the long haul, and you may percieve no change from week-to-week or month-to-month. There is improvement going on, though. The better you get, the slower the rate of improvement will get, too. One day you'll pull out an exercise that you gave up on a couple years ago and like magic, you can play it. That's the improvement that you don't notice until you think "Hey, I couldn't play that last time I tried, and now I can." Keep on plugging away at it with that in mind...
     
  6. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2011
    Hi ricecakes,
    We all know what you're talking about and it's frustrating to go through periods of suckyness (I think that's a word). Here's what honestly keeps me going:
    1. I can't leave the thing alone even during sucky times.
    2. Back in the teenage days when I was (much more) competitive, I was serious about rehearsing because I hated losing more than I loved winning. That's not to say I'm not serious anymore, it was just different when fueled by teenage angst.
    VB summed it up best. Keep at it and wait for a miracle.
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    Ricecakes... I am not so sure your perceived set back should be gauged in comparison to a "lazy" guy. I am betting that guy isn't so lazy, and his progress is more of what happens when time and commitment is devote toward improvement. If this is the case you can learn an important lesson from "lazy" guy if you fairly acknowledge this My concern is you calling him "lazy". Let him be a role model for you. Strive to achieve his current level and then strive to surpass it, if indeed you have the same goal. But perhaps the two of you are very different and "lazy guy" is good in going toward a particular direction, and you are better at going in another. But Get Over IT. Stop labeling your competition as "lazy", or you will be defeated if you accept the likely potential behind falsely labeling someone. Anxiety can be our friend, anger is always our enemy.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    NO VB DIDN'T sum it up best. I usually agree with the both of you but to have someone wait for a miracle is almost a self defeating prophecy. A miracle is an event not ascribable to human power or the laws of nature and consequently attributed to a supernatural, especially divine, agency. The chances of you to atone to becoming a GOD are rare to slim, and in my faith, I know of only one individual that achieved that level, at least as is recorded to read in a book that is know by most as a Bible.

    Wait rather for the hard, devoted passionate work that IS within the realm of human power to push you toward the REALITY that you can be a highly achieving trumpet player. I will agree that we all have set backs by what ever measure we inflict on ourselves, that can be motivation itself to kick human nature butt to evolve and move forward... For crapping out loud!
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    See... THIS is the human evolutionary progress I am talking about, its just that Dale says it more eloquently than me. I think it has to do with the snow in his face giving him that "Oh Wow" moment. Nice work sled boy.

    PS: MY analyst told me I needed to post this to atone with you.
     
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2011
    Hi Gman,
    You stated:
    "NO VB DIDN'T sum it up best. I usually agree with the both of you but to have someone wait for a miracle is almost a self defeating prophecy. A miracle is an event not ascribable to human power or the laws of nature and consequently attributed to a supernatural, especially divine, agency.
    ----
    A miracle is something that's not suppose to happen, but does. Kinda like the USA beating Russia at hockey in the (i think) 1970's.
    ---
    Maybe you're right. Miracle may not be the best word in this situation.
    ---
    ---
    Dr.Mark
     

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