Guidance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ricecakes230, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Insanity is not defining what it means to do the same things over and over again. I have been playing the same "daily routine" for well over 40 years - not insane, rather a guarantee that I will keep getting good paying jobs for the next 10 to 20 anyway........

    I get the impression that many are looking for a method book with the success recipe. It does not exist.

    To succeed, you need to CONSTANTLY do the same things: LISTEN, THINK, plan, react, adjust. You continually have to optimize your body use, breathing, hearing. You do NOT regularly need a different mouthpiece, teacher or book.

    Maybe we need to define success. For some it is simply getting through a church service, for others it is getting through a show, for others it is even pulling the horn out of the case more than once a week. With this vast difference of goals, it is tough to define what is best. If we are not playing at least 30 minutes every day, there are serious issues with consistence. That may or may not be a problem for the player.

    It is very useful when we put our comments in context.......

     
  3. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi ricecakes,
    I think I have an idea that can help you out. I really believe that we all need heros. Without heros, we have nothing to strive for or live up to. You need a hero. Someone that you like so much that you can't get their sound out of your head. Their sound stains you so that no matter what you do, you hear them in your imagination.
    I would very much like you to watch and listen to Alison Balsom. I can not think of a better person to emulate and try to be like. My hope? That when you really hear her, it changes your chemistry. I would like to see you dog her sound, technique, style and dig into it so much that your primary goal on the trumpet is to sound like her.
    In essence, your hero becomes your addiction and that's a very good thing. Wanna get good? Get a hero.
    Dr.Mark
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    My favorite hero is a stuffed-to-the-gills Italian-deli meat, cheese, and vegetable sandwich. I play so much better knowing I have that to look forward to at the end of a gig.
     
  5. Juarez-MA

    Juarez-MA Pianissimo User

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    Everyone beat me to the gentle/holistic words of wisdom that I would have shared.
    So I'll use my dad/teacher voice: No one person is better (in general) than another person. We all have our strengths and weaknesses.
    Like VG said, this is just a plateau. Try to measure your growth in reading/musical technique as well.
    I always tell my students that you can learn to technically play brass in a month to a year. Tone, extended technique, and musicality/phrasing are long and personal pursuits.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I'm with Rowuk on this one. In the medical world, we call this flat lining. The is equivalent to death. Always strive to keep those squiggles moving. For me, I play in a no flat line zone. I have never experienced a plateau, just a PR interval knowing darned well there is a QRS complex just a half a heart beat away. The trumpet experience should be like this. No plateaus for me.
     
  7. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    Well....I understand the "plateau" mentality perfectly. Been there. Got through. Probably be there again. Will get through again.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I tell my students the opposite: technique without tone and musicality is worthless. We get MUSICAL and SONIC results from the very first lesson. The technique is ALWAYS secondary.
     
  9. Juarez-MA

    Juarez-MA Pianissimo User

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    Right. I talk about producing music from the ink on the page with my students.
    My advice to OP was (paraphrased): Don't get hung up on technique or use it to compare yourself to others. It's in musicality where you will perceive your growth.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Music has NOTHING to do with ink and never has. Even wrong notes can be very musical. Just like a baby only uses primitive "noises" to communicate wonderful things to its audience, even a very basic command of the trumpet can accomplish the same level of pleasure.

    Generally we perceive our growth with things that are quantifiable: fast, high, loud. Very seldom have I run into a teacher or parent that uses joy or tears as a measure of accomplishment or failure.

    You don't have to dig an ever deeper hole to explain what you didn't mean in the first place. There is nothing wrong with using objective goals to keep a student motivated. Comparing ourselves to others is how the human state works. The intelligent teachers give their students the proper things to compare: attitude, respect, dedication, preparedness instead of fast, high, loud. I know how good or bad a student is simply by listening to them "warm up" before a rehearsal. Those couple of notes tell me if they are focussed on themselves or reality - or nowhere.

    Most players that think that they are "concentrating" on musicality, generally are just behind the beat...........

     

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