guide to reading music

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Saile, Jan 3, 2011.

  1. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2010
    My teacher and i basically go more of the practical work during our lessons.

    My teacher said that i should work on understanding how to read music at home to save the time during the lesson.

    So i want to know, whats a usefull way to understanding how to read music and what the ntoes mean in relation to what im playing etc

    Thanks
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Grab a Hymnbook from church. 700+ easy tunes with the meaning in plain language typed underneath. If you go to Lutheran church, many of the Hymnbooks are in 4 part harmony so you have 1400+ different treble clef parts.............

    Learning to read means doing it. That is how the human body works. There is no intellectual substitute.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011
  3. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    I have a book that I've been meaning to look through called "Elementary Training for Musicians" by Paul Hindemith.
    It may be what you'd want
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Salie asks:
    So i want to know, whats a usefull way to understanding how to read music and what the ntoes mean in relation to what im playing etc
    ---------------------------
    Great question. A good way to get a handle on something you're not sure of is to have someone show you how it goes a couple of times, right?
    In this case, it would be something showing you how it goes.
    I would recommend downloading a "FREE" music software like Finale or any of the others out there that are free.
    Once its downloaded, copy the music you need to play on to the music software. Once it's written (which should only take about 10 minutes tops) hit the play back button and watch and listen. A curser follows along the music while the music plays. This way you can learn how many beats any particular note/rest gets.
    Hope this helps
    I just wish they had something like this when I was young(er).
     
  5. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    What helped me in sight reading was recognizing patterns,both rhythmic and melodic. The more you do it,the better you get.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Probably not--it is real complicated.

    I would suggest the following link: Dolmetsch Online - Music Theory Online Contents

    For identifying notes (we want to reach the point that playing becomes reflexive, and that requires countless repetitions) long tones can help--when playing a "g" for example, picture the "g" in your head (where it sits in relation to the staff) and think the following mantra: "This is a "g," it looks like this, this is a "g," it looks like this, this is a "g," it looks like this, this is a "g," it looks like this, this is a "g," it looks like this...."

    For rhythm, I like the "sub-divide and conquer" technique. Take the smallest rhythmic unit (say, a sixteenth note) and apply it to the whole piece. If the rhythm in question is a dotted eighth/sixteenth going from "a" to "g" play (as sixteenths) "a""a" "a" "g." After countless repetitions you can do this automatically in your head.

    All this entails a lot of work, but I've gotten plenty of gigs not because i was the best player, but because I was the best reader. Once I was flown in from over 400 miles away, was driven to the concert and barely had time to put on my tails. The conductor told me "We do the Overture to the Marriage of Figgaro in one." Then is was off to the races.... The beer after the concert tasted real, real good!

    Have fun!
     
  7. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2010
    But how will i know what to put on the software, if i don't even know what's what.

    I know very basic like the C and the G. Once it gets between the lines, i have to look into it and use the thing i learnt as a child at school.

    EGBDF (for the lines)
    FACE (for between the lines)

    Im not sure if this is effective enough.

    Another thing my old teacher said was that eventually when you learn to play songs and scales off the book, you will learn what note what.

    At the moment, im doing scales off a written piece a paper and trying to his those notes properly.
     
  8. laurie

    laurie Pianissimo User

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    Jan 17, 2005
    Australia
    It would be hepfull to know how long you have been playing,and what your musical experience is.
    Having said that, the best way to to learn to read (in my experience) is by throwing yourself in the deep end and join a band. Most community bands welcome new players,and often have a beginners band for the less experienced. These are a great place to learn a whole bunch of stuff.
    You will soon discover that no matter what the musical genre,all western music is based on patterns. Once you've learnt to recognise the patterns,you will be well on the way.
    Cheers
    Laurie
     
  9. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Start with the link from VB; great stuff there. Everyone can use this...
    And enjoy it, you can also use a metronome to get the timing correct for counting beats.

    When I was starting to read music, I could read the music slowly and finger the trumpet notes as I went along without playing for real. Once I have read the music through, then I would start to play.
    Cheers
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    BTW Hymnbooks are a great source of tunes that you may know. Worth checking to get some from the local church, and/or library.
     

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