Guitar Center has been sold.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetMD, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. musicalmason

    musicalmason Forte User

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    I agree that the economy will always need the large retailers to sustain itself. However, I think there will always be somebody to fill that void. I've got a webpage where I sell stuff, so do thousands of other people. If WWBW and guitar center goes under, why couldn't I become one of the big players? Or you? Or somebody else. Less customers going to them, means more to us, and inevitably the person with the best SEO optimization, the best prices and the best customer service will rise to be the next "big seller" which will keep the sales volume up. There are a few contenders out there already emerging (I'm not one of them...yet).


    As for buying direct from manufactures, yeah, some do it. But I don't see it catching on. Companies use dealers so they don't have deal with customers on a regular basis. It's the same reason 80% of my instrument repairs are done for music stores. I don't mind making 20% less on a repair if they take care of finding the customers, billing the customer, actually collecting the money etc. etc. I drop off the finished product, get paid right away and move on. Worth it (for me). I think many major manufacturers have a similar outlook.
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    First of all ... no fair using big words (thank you Wiki). :-)

    Secondy ... it's a euphemism for communism. Really?

    Mike
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    The small, privately owned music stores have to figure out their own strategy for dealing with the race to the (dollar) bottom of the big guys. They need to look at packaging extra value into their sales, like a free annual derive, or a free introductory lesson, or extra supplies (like oils and reeds etc), and present these in such a way that the customer cannot do an apples for apples price comparison with the big guys. I did this successfully with a store I was managing in Sydney in the 90s - I called it a "Starter Pack". This idea is all over the place these days - the thing is, to stay competitive you have to think outside the box, and only dwell on those things which are within your control.
     
  4. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    And, as Reedman1 would probably say, Veganism ROFLROFLROFL
     
  5. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    No, where did you get that simplistic notion?
     
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Syndicalism is the take-over of government and of industry by the "worker".

    I confess that my conclusion might be simplistic. It wasn't meant to be accusatory. And I acknowledge that you may have a different definition for this term.

    Mike
     
  7. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    Well, there must be some valid alternative to fascist corporate dictatorship?
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Phew, getting warm in here! ;-)
     
  9. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    My business model (if you want to call it that) is quite opposite. Yes, I am happy to do subcontract for music stores, and to accept instruments from out of town via UPS etc., but I regard my service as being as much for the player as for the instrument. I invite them into my workshop, and try to provide a safe haven for them. I try to get to know them - find out what makes them tick. And I attempt to turn them into what I call Meta-Clients. I try to turn the repair process into a quality social (even therapeutic) event for the customer. They are upset, the valve is sticking. I need to free the valve and reassure the player. I regard the second as probably even more important than the first..
    Welcome to all Meta-clients!
     
  10. musicalmason

    musicalmason Forte User

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    Very cool. The 20% of repairs I do for private customers are not unlike that. I do enjoy working with pro/serious players one on one. Sadly, the vast majority of what I do is "just make it work" repairs for students, brought to the shop by parents who seemingly would just as soon throw the instrument out and let their kids watch tv instead if practice. Those are the customers I'd rather not deal with.
     

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